A non-partisan journal of the left.

Arts

Artists and the Law: Exploring A Jurisprudence Of New Capabilities

When I first heard the suggestion that the judiciary and greater Parliamentary oversight could redress the reckless use of new capabilities by Britain's security service GCHQ, an image flashed into my mind of a 1903 painting by Australian impressionist Tom Roberts - known locally as The Big Picture... [read more]

Why bad movies keep coming out and what to do about it

Unlike the babbling brook of Hollywood – with its suppression of truth, fake heroes and warmongering – a masterpiece, or just a good movie, is unforgettable, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Bahrain

History replays itself over and over again. An endless loop. And we watch. Mesmerised. As if it were the first time. And we never learn... From Hungary to Bahrain, Dr Faisal Mikdadi contemplates the struggle for democracy.... [read more]
 

Our Home - A Human Unity Statement

Elizabeth Ellis reminds us of humanity's mission statement... [read more]

Review: The Master

OK, I saw "The Master." Now I know what the fuss is about. I don't pretend to know the film's "message" but I walked out afterward seeing/feeling the world from its point of view, writes Jean Claude van Italie.... [read more]

Has ‘Citizen Khan’ on BBC One bridged the gap? .

‘Citizen Khan’ might have taken the mickey of some Muslims, but not of Islam, and that is a huge difference. I would not say that the show has stereotyped Asians as claimed, but rather seemed to be a reflection of self-criticism, writes Iqbal Tamini.... [read more]
 

Isle of Wight Festival – an alternative perspective – June 2012

Miles Caston describes the highlights of this year’s Isle of Wight festival and suggests a ‘greener’ way to enjoy music festivals... [read more]

Coming to Grips with Zizek

Two new books by Slavoj Zizek have recently been reviewed by John Gray in the The New York Review of Books, here Thomas Riggins reviews Gray's article. ... [read more]

Change is the Only Constant: Got Any Spare?

outRageous! is back asking the questions no one else dares... [read more]
 

Camping Needs Solid Ground

LPJ's arts correspondent and resident philosopher, Stephen Gilbert, comments that an emphasis on celebrity is the prevailing television flavour of the age, infecting every genre of programming, whether appropriate or not... [read more]

'Curious anatomys': an extraordinary story of dissection and discovery

Tomasz Pierscionek reviews a rare exhibition of 17th century anatomical dissections publically displayed for the first time... [read more]

DEREK, or LITTLE by LITTLE

By common consent (at least among those like me who lived through it), the ‘golden age’ of broadcasting – at the BBC especially – was that which spanned the 1960s, writes W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]
 

The state of Alternative comedy

This year Britain’s king of alternative comedy, Billy Connolly, hits 70-years-old. Still alive and kicking. But is the notion of alternative comedy dead asks Miles Caston.... [read more]

Alternative music

Pop dinosaurs head up Britain’s Eurovision challenge and the Olympic jamboree. New seasons of X Factor and Pop Idol are being spawned in some modern marketing womb of entertainment hell. They are destroying Britain’s reputation as an alternative music powerhouse, writes Miles Caston.... [read more]

Noncommittal for kindle or less than kind?

The Kindle - an infinity of reading or a bibliophile's nightmare? Stephen Gilbert shares his thoughts on the matter.... [read more]
 

News International Wapping Exhibition closes as Sun on Sunday is launched

David Eade reviews the News International Wapping – 25 Years on exhibition that has been touring around the UK... [read more]

Hollywood is a place where they'll pay you a thousand dollars for a kiss and fifty cents for your soul

In an exclusive for the London Progressive Journal, writer and former actor John Wight reflects on his years in Hollywood and shines a spotlight on the ‘glamour’ of life in the movie industry... [read more]

The Politics of the Psyche

BBC 4’s Saturday night primetime slot is cornering the market in excellent European drama but we don’t need Denmark to point out how impotent we feel. However idealistic were its ancient Roman origins, the UK’s version of representative democracy has become as distorted as a burning pillar of wax, says outRageous!... [read more]
 

The Lady Doth Screech too Much

Rhys Harrison reviews 'Iron Lady', a recent film about the life of Margaret Thatcher ... [read more]

Transcendental argument

Through a mist of tears, I caught up with the conclusion of 'My Transsexual Summer', Channel 4’s four-part fly-on-the-wall series, says W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]

Obit: Never a Soft or quiet Russell

W Stephen Gilbert pays tribute to Ken Russell, the enigmatic, eccentric film director who died on Sunday. ... [read more]
 

There’s an elephant in the room

In the first of our series of political poetry, David Foley waxes lyrical in his song about bankers' bonuses and bailouts. ... [read more]

Taking a look at L.H.O.O.Q

outRageous! gives a critique of the first edition of L.H.O.O.Q- a new online culture magazine... [read more]