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Khaled Taja: The Anthony Quinn of Arab Drama

Khaled Taja, 70 years old and the iconic figure of Arabic drama, is planning to play the leading role in a movie about the tunnels of Gaza, writes Iqbal Tamimi.... [read more]

Winston Churchill the Novelist

The fiftieth anniversary of Churchill's state funeral brings out the usual accolades as well as the customary recriminations... [read more]

The Lady Doth Screech too Much

Rhys Harrison reviews 'Iron Lady', a recent film about the life of Margaret Thatcher ... [read more]

Bullying and Hijacking Muslim Women’s Voices in the UK Live on Air

Iqbal Tamimi reflects on a gross incident of on-air sexist bullying on the UK Arabic TV channel, Alhiwar.... [read more]

Reportage: Adjusting the Focus

Two book reviews by outRageous!... [read more]

Ten Problems with the Anti-Russia Obsession

Western media and Democratic Party politicians have made a major campaign accusing Russia of “meddling” in the U.S. election. The following are major problems with the “anti-Russia” theme, starting with the lack of clear evidence.... [read more]

Becoming free, the need for a child to read!

Growing up, I was fortunate enough to come from a family where reading books was encouraged and seen as vital for the development of spelling. Visits to the library were a past time and among the furniture of the home, heaped book cases were normal... [read more]

Has ‘Citizen Khan’ on BBC One bridged the gap? .

‘Citizen Khan’ might have taken the mickey of some Muslims, but not of Islam, and that is a huge difference. I would not say that the show has stereotyped Asians as claimed, but rather seemed to be a reflection of self-criticism, writes Iqbal Tamini.... [read more]

Bad Sight of the Week

At the weekend, I sent a letter to The Observer via email. So sure am I that the paper will not run it this coming Sunday that I breathe life into it by reproducing it here below... [read more]

Camping Needs Solid Ground

LPJ's arts correspondent and resident philosopher, Stephen Gilbert, comments that an emphasis on celebrity is the prevailing television flavour of the age, infecting every genre of programming, whether appropriate or not... [read more]

The Bible of the revolution and its Quran

The 2011 revolution of the people of Egypt shocked the international community on many different levels, says Iqbal Tamimi.... [read more]

Italian Elections: More of the Same

Samuele Mazzolini reflects on an election that has consolidated the dominance of Silvo Berlusconi's centre-right bloc, and the continuing malaise of the Italian left.... [read more]

The End of Certainty

Stephen Chan, Professor of International Relations at the School of Oriental and African Studies, talks about the adventures that inspired his new book, 'The End of Certainty'.... [read more]

Unscripted: Green Zone Theatre and the Shoe Drama

Ramzy Baroud on how Muntadhar al-Zaidi's shoe-throwing intervention served to pierce, however momentarily, the veil of stage-managed deception which characterises Nuri al-Maliki's Iraq.... [read more]

And Where is Glastonbury?

The hope is that we wake up to something within our grasp at last.... [read more]

Parliamentary Riffraff

When Adlai Stevenson ran for the presidency, he was told "Don't worry, every thinking person will vote for you." "But I need a majority," Stevenson famously replied.... [read more]

On the Road of Damascus, I Met Jeremy Corbyn

I come from a fairly long line of mercantile family forebears with strong business skills and profit inspired attitudes. Although I chose not to go into business as my brothers did and I became a teacher of English, every emotional nerve in my body believed in wealth creation as being the only way forward for all.... [read more]

Danegeld

It was just over a thousand years ago that the King of England shook his piggy bank and found it full of twigs and trinkets. He needed dosh and he needed it fast.... [read more]

The Invisible Diasporan (Part 1)

Mallards Cottage was where I wrote my first novel. I called it The Return. I used to dream most of its events – the very plot was born of a dream on Christmas Eve of 1976... [read more]

In the meantime things are getting meaner

In the meantime there is a crisis of democracy. It is not a crisis in one country. The peace dividends we were promised have been squandered.... [read more]

Confessions of a Megalomaniac

I was invited by Mahmood Abbas, the President of the Palestinian National Authority, to take part in joint Palestinian-Israeli consultations in advance of the international conference in Paris.... [read more]

The Left Will Only Win the Argument When It Takes Back Control of the Conversation

Let the Left fracture into smaller pieces, and then let it unite in a coalition determined to change the minds of the voters... [read more]

Language of the Years

A poem by Dr Faysal Mikdadi... [read more]

In the Panama Capers we Trust

The leaked Panama Papers, from the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca & Co, are spilling the beans on the details of what the rich, powerful and greedy get up to with unseemly amounts of dosh... [read more]

Corbyn – A Very British Story

Nowhere else in the world of politics, other than in Britain, is there or could there be a Jeremy Corbyn... [read more]

What has education done for you?

A poem by Dr Faysal Mikdadi dedicated to David Walpole... [read more]

The return of George Orwell and Big Brother’s war on Palestine, Ukraine and the truth

In his latest essay, John Pilger describes the liberal "one-way, legal/moral screen" behind which great power and its Orwellian propaganda ensure an impunity for war and deception, dependent on what Leni Riefenstahl called our "submissive void".... [read more]

Goal Moscow

The USA wants to turn Ukraine into a permanent area of crisis, keeping it just off the boil of war. In this way Russia will feel threatened... [read more]

The International Brigade of Terror?

For many years, I’ve understood the involvement of British fighters in the Spanish Civil War, to have been made up of people from a variety of different backgrounds, who took up arms to combat the spread of Fascism in Europe... [read more]

The Day That Spanish Democracy Died

These are exciting times for Spanish royalists. They anticipate a new king, and it appears they are going to get one... [read more]

UK: Prime Minister Finds God, Bans Bishops, Priests, the Poor – and Crutches

When Prime Minister David Cameron pulls a stunt, or indeed, announces a “ground breaking” new policy, it is pretty well guaranteed to back fire. Indeed, his coalition government policy U-turns are heading for encyclopaedic... [read more]

Return, Return oh Shulamit

Dina Dinur, the wife of the Holocaust-writer K. Zetnik, called to invite me to meet Pete Seeger... [read more]

Britain's Legacy in Palestine (Part 2 of 2)

Dr Faysal Mikdadi publishes an excellent account of Palestine's history, focusing on how the economic, racist, religious, nationalistic, commercial and orientalist attitudes of Britain shaped the land and its people (Part 2 of 2)... [read more]

One of the truest journalists is a cartoonist armed with a penguin

Steve Bell is a contemporary Hogarth, with a touch of Peter Sellers, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Iraq: The Beats and the Bedouins

After the 2003 invasion of Iraq, day to day accounts of what was taking place did not come from left or right wing journalists but from ordinary Iraqi writers, who gave outsiders a unique insight into events... [read more]

A review of Anita's revolution

Linda Rogers reviews a novel by Shirley Langer, friend of Cuba and witness to the early years of the revolution... [read more]

The Shame and Duty of a Paranoid State

The rise of neo-Zionism in Israel goes against everything Jews have struggled against for centuries, explains Oliver Thompson ... [read more]

Out of it

John Green reviews Palestinian author Selma Dabbagh's debut novel... [read more]

Palestine’s New Status: A History Rerun or a New Palestinian Strategy

Palestine has become a “non-member state” at the United Nations as of Thursday November 29, 2012.The draft of the UN resolution beckoning what many perceive as a historic moment passed with an overwhelming majority of General Assembly members: 138 votes in favour, nine against and 41 abstentions, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Mass media directing the masses

Luke Innes looks at the effect of mass media on the working class in Britain... [read more]

Digital Gods and Monsters

Our world view is in danger of being dictated by the digital gods. Bryan Taylor reports on how Google and the social media we revel in are moulding themselves around us.... [read more]

The Politics of the Psyche

BBC 4’s Saturday night primetime slot is cornering the market in excellent European drama but we don’t need Denmark to point out how impotent we feel. However idealistic were its ancient Roman origins, the UK’s version of representative democracy has become as distorted as a burning pillar of wax, says outRageous!... [read more]

An outRageous! essay on The Arts, Education and The People.

This rant is aimed at your crassness, Cameron. It goes to the heart of what is art, and why it's so important in preparing people for democracy, says outRageous!... [read more]

Damned Scroungers

Dr Tomasz Pierscionek reviews a book challenging one of the last remaining forms of prejudice deemed ‘socially acceptable’ in modern Britain. (This book is now free to download from this review.)... [read more]

A Ghost Story Retailed

W Stephen Gilbert delivers an up-to-date, state and fate of the retail trade in Britain, it is partly warmingly, personal and anecdotal, and partly a critical overview: part one... [read more]

Book review: Venceremos

Dr Tomasz Pierscionek reviews Howard Waxman\'s first novel- a political thriller called Venceremos... [read more]

Are U.S./NATO powers aiming to make Syria into Libya 2.0?

Mazda Majidi asks whether the NATO attack on Libya was just a dress rehersal for a future invasion of Syria... [read more]

Walled In

Science and humanities students view each other with incomprehension: blame our dumb, narrow schooling, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

Book of the Month: 'The Lacuna' by Barbara Kingsolver

John Green recommends this witty and evocative political novel set in 1930s Mexico.... [read more]

Matter of the Heart

Uri Avnery looks back over the first 100 days of Binyamin Netanyahu's second term as Israeli Prime Minister.... [read more]