A non-partisan journal of the left.

Search London Progressive Journal

  • Enter text and click Search. This search does not accept exact strings with " or '. For exact searching click 'Exact Search'.
  • or

Spain’s fishing armada stopped from ‘raping’ Gibraltar’s waters

LPJ’s Iberian correspondent, David Eade, reports on tensions between Spanish fishermen and the Gibraltarian government following the rescindment of a ‘Joint Understanding’ that allowed Spanish vessels to fish in Gibraltar’s waters... [read more]

Blue Desert

George Monbiot asks: Why is no one brave enough to stand up to the fishing industry? ... [read more]

Political Barbed Wire

Why are 97 per cent of our rivers shut to the public? A millionaire minister’s amazing conflicts of interest give you a clue, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

What is behind this fracking mania? Unbridled machismo

Promoting extractive industries is seen by politicians as a proper, manly pursuit, even if it makes no sense, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

It’s Franco’s heart that beats in Madrid

No Gibraltarian, and come to that anybody living in the real world, will believe the confrontations at sea last week over the reef laying and the six hour car queues to leave Gibraltar at the weekend were anything but linked, writes David Eade.... [read more]

Protect and Survive

George Monbiot on how Peter Mandelson is bullying the world’s poorest nations into following a development route that can’t work. ... [read more]

Manufactured Famine

George Monbiot on the European trade initiatives which are likely to exacerbate existing food shortages in the developing world.... [read more]

The Naming of Things

George Monbiot suggests one small way in which the collapse of biodiversity could be slowed.... [read more]

Reflections on China’s South Sea Trouble Thomas Riggins

Lying in the South China Sea between Indochina and the Philippines is a collection of 700 or so small islands collectively known as the Spratly Islands... [read more]

uk eurosceptics

Labour kept Britain out of the euro. Labour MPs have elected three Eurosceptics out of three to represent them on the party’s National Executive Committee... [read more]

The year we did our best to abandon the natural world

Emissions are rising, ice is melting and yet the response of governments is simply to pretend that none of it is happening, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

Recipes for Disaster

George Monbiot asked whether it is about time the media stopped publishing recipes for threatened fish?... [read more]

For Those Who Love Life

The people cutting open bluefin tuna nets are heroes: they are stepping in where governments have failed, to protect our common heritage, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

The call for a UK amendment on the EU

There is a rising tide of Euroscepticism within mainstream political parties and on the floors of national Parliaments throughout the European Union, says David Lindsay.... [read more]

Conflict on the Korean Peninsula

The tensions on the Korean border are unlikely to die down so long as the US maintains its intransigent stance towards North Korea, says Kevin Gray.... [read more]

Tulsi Gabbard Comes to San Francisco

“I'm running for president to be able to bring about this sea change in our foreign policy that is so necessary for us and for the world.”... [read more]

A Song is Born

The situation in the Gaza Strip is as close to hell as one can get. Food at subsistence level, electricity for two to four hours a day, the water is polluted. Work is extremely scarce. Only the most severely ill are let out.... [read more]

WOMEN WORK TO ADDRESS SILENCE OVER WAR ATROCITIES IN POST-CONFLICT BOUGAINVILLE

In the northern coastal villages of Hako Constituency on Buka Island, in Papua New Guinea’s eastern autonomous region of Bougainville, life to all appearances is carefree... [read more]

Labour and the Trident Question

We all knew that Trident missiles would become an issue when Corbyn became leader of the UK Labour party... [read more]

The Scottish Industrial Revolution, or The Scottish First Industrial Miracle 1700–1800

Most accounts of the origins of the industrial revolution are Anglo-centric, focused upon how the industrial revolution in England began from about 1750... [read more]

Fateful Steps That Led to the Crisis in Ukraine (Part 2)

The borders of the Ukraine today are very different than they were before WWII... [read more]

Our government’s big green idea: let’s subsidise natural disasters

Britain pays billions to support farming, and then billions to repair the catastrophic damage it causes, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Obama’s 2015 State of the Union Address: “That’s Not Who we Are”

Borrowing from Hollywood-themed awards ceremonies, political theatre was taken to new lows with Obama’s sixth State of the Union speech to the US Congress on January 20th... [read more]

It's time to shout stop on this war on the living world

Our consumption is trashing a natural world infinitely more fascinating and intricate than the stuff we produce, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Meeting in a Tunnel

The Israeli media are now totally subservient. There is no independent reporting. "Military correspondents" are not allowed into Gaza to see for themselves, they are willingly reduced to parroting army communiqués, presenting them as their personal observations... [read more]

Chagos: Britain, the CIA and Diego Garcia – Something fishy going on?

My attention was drawn by chance to another article on Diego Garcia in the Independent stating that the government must renegotiate with US over the use of the island for rendition flights.... [read more]

'Good' and 'Bad' war - and the struggle of memory against forgetting

The regime that Washington created in the South, the “good” Korea, was set up and run largely by those who had collaborated with Japan and America, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

'Good and Bad' war - and the struggle of memory against forgetting

The regime that Washington created in the South, the “good” Korea, was set up and run largely by those who had collaborated with Japan and America, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Iraq: The Beats and the Bedouins

After the 2003 invasion of Iraq, day to day accounts of what was taking place did not come from left or right wing journalists but from ordinary Iraqi writers, who gave outsiders a unique insight into events... [read more]

Not The Wharton Bill

When James Wharton stages his Canute-like attempt to prevent Labour from taking back Stockton South, then that party ought to put down an amendment declining to give the 'Daft Bill' a Second Reading in view of its entire failure to address some issues, writes David Lindsay.... [read more]

Gaza Boats Seized, but ‘Freedom Waves’ Will Continue

Despite the Israeli government’s continued aggression towards humanitarian aid ships sailing to Gaza, Ramzy Baroud shows how the aid flotillas show no sign of giving in to intimidation. ... [read more]

Bullying and Hijacking Muslim Women’s Voices in the UK Live on Air

Iqbal Tamimi reflects on a gross incident of on-air sexist bullying on the UK Arabic TV channel, Alhiwar.... [read more]

The Money Gusher

The oil industry’s decommissioning costs will dwarf those of nuclear power. The money being made now should be put aside to meet them, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Bye Bye, Dubai?

Mick Brooks looks at the unfolding crisis in Dubai, and its potential implications for the world economy. ... [read more]

A Paradigm Shift in Singapore: Yet Apec Offers No Clear Answers

Ramzy Baroud on the high-profile international summit held in Singapore this week.... [read more]

Plan Colombia Devastates Afro-Colombian Communities

Garry Leech examines the devastating impact of US policy in Colombia upon the country's Afro-Colombian rural communities.... [read more]

Congress Confronts Its Contradictions

George Monbiot on why it's ordinary taxpayers who will pay the price for the incompetence of big finance.... [read more]