A non-partisan journal of the left.

Search London Progressive Journal

  • Enter text and click Search. This search does not accept exact strings with " or '. For exact searching click 'Exact Search'.
  • or

What might make Christopher Hitchens change his mind about 1492?

On the anniversary of ‘Columbus day’ David Hill questions journalist Christopher Hitchens\' admiration of the year 1492... [read more]

Christopher Hitchens - an obit and opinion

Amid the avalanche of articles and obituaries written in tribute to Christopher Hitchens in the wake of his recent passing, we have been reacquainted with the essential condition of western liberalism - moral depravity, says John Wight. ... [read more]

Colombia’s Double Realities: Threats Against Indigenous Communities Ignored as Calls for a Second Re-election of President Uribe Get Louder

As Colombia's President Uribe continues to target the country's indigenous communities, Mario A. Murillo examines why many Colombians are opposed to Uribe's reactionary government.... [read more]

U.S. IMMIGRATION: Is It Still an (inter-)National Asset or a Heartland Liability? You be the final Judge!

Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses yearning to breathe free ... [read more]

From Afghanistan to Anantnag via Abbotabad (Part 1)

The death of twenty people on April 1 between Indian security forces and armed Hizbul Mujahedin militants in Anantnag district in Indian-controlled South Kashmir is a stark reminder of a criminal legacy of the anti-colonial religious-nationalism that has its modern roots in the Afghan jihad... [read more]

A New Israeli-Palestinian Discourse

There is a need for both Israelis and Palestinians to change their discourse which is based on a mixture of rewriting history, expansionist aims, victimhood and endless conspiracy theories where none exist... [read more]

The Pen Trumps the Sword Anytime (Part 4)

The fourth part of an 'Introduction' to an illustrated book of poetry by Faysal Mikdadi. The collection, Painted into a Corner, appeared in the summer of 2014... [read more]

Monsanto’s Biotech Public Relations Makeover: Lubricating the Wheels of the GMO Trojan Horse

Monsanto believes it is having trouble getting its message across to the public. Last year, it began a makeover. It realised that it and GMOs have an image problem... [read more]

Bury my Heart at Gaza City

The similarities between the building of Israel and the US are astonishing. The native people are portrayed as savage, inherently violent, unable to understand peace... [read more]

Britain's Legacy in Palestine (Part 1 of 2)

Dr Faysal Mikdadi publishes an excellent account of Palestine's history, focusing on how the economic, racist, religious, nationalistic, commercial and orientalist attitudes of Britain shaped the land and its people (Part 1 of 2)... [read more]

For Pope Francis the liberal, this promises to be a very bloody Sunday

Francis is the poster pope for progressives. But canonising a genocidal missionary like Junípero Serra epitomises the Catholic history problem, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

'Urgent Threats' of Yesteryear

In the second article in his series, 'Contextualising the Threat of Islam', Richard Greeman looks back on the US government's long history of constructing official enemies to justify foreign aggression and domestic repression alike.... [read more]

Chávez Declares Support for Venezuelan Indigenous Occupying Ancestral Lands

James Suggett on Hugo Chávez's support for indigenous communities in Venezuela.... [read more]

Alcohol: Why do we drink?

Alcohol consumption is one damaging effect among many that flow from this dominant socio-economic system... [read more]

A Song is Born

The situation in the Gaza Strip is as close to hell as one can get. Food at subsistence level, electricity for two to four hours a day, the water is polluted. Work is extremely scarce. Only the most severely ill are let out.... [read more]

A History of Idiocy

I am furious. And I have good reason to be furious.... [read more]

The Invisible Diasporan (Part 1)

Mallards Cottage was where I wrote my first novel. I called it The Return. I used to dream most of its events – the very plot was born of a dream on Christmas Eve of 1976... [read more]

Iran as the Historical Tri-Continental Bridge, and Ireland? An Ethno-Cultural and Etymological Interconnectedness

Over forty years ago, a number of Irish professors visiting the University of Tehran disseminated their research findings that there is a firm anthropological connection between Iran and Ireland from the distant past... [read more]

Abu-Mazen's Balance Sheet

People wonder why Netanyahu denounces Abbas as an "inciter", while not mentioning Hamas. To solve this mystery, one must understand the Israeli Right does not fear war, but is afraid of international pressure – and therefore the "moderate" Abbas is more dangerous than the "terrorist" Hamas.... [read more]

When God Despairs

God is shaking his head. These humans, He asks Himself, will they never learn... [read more]

Leader without Glory

Abu Mazen was very different from Arafat. Arafat was flamboyant, spontaneous, extrovert. Abu Mazen is rather withdrawn, introverted, cautious, meticulous... [read more]

What GMOs Are Really About: Profits, Power and Geopolitics

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are not essential for feeding the world... [read more]

Menace on the Menu: Development and the Globalization of Servitude‏ (Part 2)

Me-first acquisitiveness is now pervasive throughout the upper strata of society... [read more]

Menace on the Menu: Development and the Globalization of Servitude‏ (Part 1)

In his book ‘The World Economy: A Millennial Perspective’, economist Angus Maddison noted that India was the richest country in the world and had controlled a third of global wealth until the 17th century... [read more]

Patagonian Dreams

During his short visit to Israel, Pope Francis laid a wreath on the grave of Theodor Herzl, writes Uri Avnery... [read more]

Capitulating To Monsanto And Wall Street: What Future India?

The Indian Oil and Environment minister has added fuel to the debate about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) by approving field trials of 200 GM food crops on behalf of companies like Monsanto... [read more]

Extreme Weather: The Maya and Us

Two weeks after Superstorm Sandy ravaged New Jersey and New York thousands of people are still without power, food or portable water and are dependent on the city, state and federal government, and increasingly on Occupy Sandy (the volunteers from Occupy Wall Street and related groups) for basic survival goods, writes Thomas Riggins.... [read more]

Bosnia and Croatia: What is the tie with Iran?

Professor David Rahni uses etymology to explain how different cultures may have more in common with each other than they think... [read more]

Democracy and Slaughter in Burma: Gold Rush Overrides Human Rights

The widespread killings of Rohingya Muslims in Burma – or Myanmar - have received only passing and dispassionate coverage in most media. What they actually warrant is widespread outrage, says Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

The great 'American' nightmare

Whilst some have gained much from India's economic boom, many have also lost out from the 'Americanisation of India'. Colin Todhunter discusses.... [read more]

Sixty years of philatelic pleasure, and now?

For the five or six generations of solitary, sedentary boys in the middle of which fell my vintage (the baby boomers), the hobby par excellence was collecting stamps, recalls W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]

How Independen​t Would An Independen​t Scotland Be?

Britain’s history of war and imperialism, and its current role as junior partner in service to US hegemony, has had a deleterious impact on British society at home, writes John Wight.... [read more]

A Clash of Fundamentalisms

In the third article in his series, 'Contextualising the Threat of Islam', Richard Greeman compares Islamic Fundamentalism with the U.S. regime's own brand on fundamentalist politics.... [read more]

Book of the Month: 'The Lacuna' by Barbara Kingsolver

John Green recommends this witty and evocative political novel set in 1930s Mexico.... [read more]

Outsourcing Unrest

George Monbiot argues that the crisis in British politics has its roots in the decline of Britain's status in the world economy.... [read more]

Paraguay's "Red Bishop" Takes Over

Nathan Morrison on the rise of Fernando Lugo in Paraguay.... [read more]