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Spot the Difference: Public Relations and Journalism

Finn Bowen asks that in light of the possible convergence of Public Relations and Journalism - once completely separate professions - can we ‘trust the truth’ the media portray? ... [read more]

Melinda Taylor: The Spy That Got Away?

On the 7th of June 2012, Melinda Taylor and three other ICC delegates were arrested in the city of Zintan in Libya by Zintani militia. How should the Australian media handle the story? Finn Bowen takes a look.... [read more]

Reactive Mismeasures: The New Yorker and the "New" Cold War Propaganda (Part 2)

This is the second part of a paragraph by paragraph commentary on a recent article posing as journalism in the March 6, 2017 issue of The New Yorker.... [read more]

‘The Internet is a Game Changer’

With news coverage gradually moving towards a 'paperless world' in the internet age, Ramzy Baroud considers the implications for political journalism.... [read more]

Hold the front page! We need free media, not an Order of Mates

The other day, I stood outside the strangely silent building where I began life as a journalist. It is no longer the human warren that was Consolidated Press in Sydney. It seems in Australia, hard-won rights are being buried beneath corporate might, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Saudi Princess becomes a 'journalist'

Earlier this month BBC World interviewed Her Royal Highness Princess Basma Bint Saud bin Abdul Azizas, however Arab journalists were surprised to hear the Saudi Princess addressed as a journalist, observes Iqbal Tamimi.... [read more]

Champions of the Overdog

Local papers are vanishing. George Monbiot asks: Does it matter? ... [read more]

Reactive Mismeasures: The New Yorker and the "New" Cold War Propaganda (Part 1)

This is the first of a five part paragraph by paragraph commentary on a recent article posing as journalism in the March 6, 2017 issue of The New Yorker... [read more]

Bullying and Hijacking Muslim Women’s Voices in the UK Live on Air

Iqbal Tamimi reflects on a gross incident of on-air sexist bullying on the UK Arabic TV channel, Alhiwar.... [read more]

Arab Journalism and Egypt’s’ claimed control over UK’s mosques

Iqbal Tamimi on the ego-fuelled misrepresentation of facts by the Arab press.... [read more]

The BBC’s defence of the ‘Death in the Med’ is far from being convincing or ethical

Iqbal Tamimi on why the BBC's response to the complaints they received of bias in their 16th August 2010 Panorama programme is inadequate.... [read more]

Tiananmen: the massacre that wasn't

What really happened 25 years ago in Tiananmen Square?... [read more]

The real invasion of Africa is not news and a licence to lie is Hollywood's gift

It is as if Africa’s proud history of liberation has been consigned to oblivion by a new master’s black colonial elite, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Cypherpunks – freedom and the future of the internet

John Green reviews Cypherpunks – freedom and the future of the internet – a book By Julian Assange with Jacob Appelbaum, Andy Müller-Maguhn and Jérémie Zimmermann... [read more]

The world war on democracy

From the Chagos islands to Libya, a ruthless system has been at work, often resorting to violence whilst trying to maintain the illusion of democracy... [read more]

Unmasking the Press

The corporate newspapers are the elite’s enforcers, misrepresenting the sources of oppression, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

The fall of an empire

Jeremy Corbyn reflects on the rise of Murdoch media empire and the years of shameless and blinkered journalism that have been a feature of the newspapers controlled by the media mogul.... [read more]

Beware the Assault on Journalism

John Pilger retraces the 'cultural Chernobyl'of Rupert Murdoch's impact on British life.... [read more]

The Internet: A Democratising Force or Information Overload?

Matt Genner examines the impact of the dot com revolution on democratic debate and political activism.... [read more]

Book of the Month: "Beyond Bogota" by Garry Leech

This month's recommendation is a work of great courage, insight and journalistic integrity, as Matt Genner explains.... [read more]

Hay Festival Raises More Questions Than Answers

Matt Genner considers Naomi Klein's comments at this year's Hay Festival.... [read more]

NUJ to Stand up for Journalism and Journalists

NUJ General Secretary Jeremy Dear believes media workers must resist cuts.... [read more]

Shurpayev Murder Highlights Authoritarianism Of Putin's Russia

Chris Bath on the latest in a series of political murders in Russia. ... [read more]

John Pilger: Why Hillary Clinton Is More Dangerous Than Donald Trump

The following is an edited version of an address given by John Pilger at the University of Sydney, entitled ‘A World War Has Begun’.... [read more]

The Great Rift

The tragedy of present-day Israel is not that there are so many divisions, but that they all converge in one large rift.... [read more]

The Widening Gap

In any list of Israel's 100 most important women, Ilana Dayan would occupy a prominent position... [read more]

John Cantlie writes from within Islamic State captivity… what messages should we take from his article?

Freedom of speech and expression has become a much debated concept depending who interprets and how it is defined... [read more]

Unpaid internships and the hypocrisy of capitalism

According to research conducted by the Sutton Trust, an educational charity based in the UK, almost a third of university graduate interns are being forced to work without pay, as a means of ‘getting their foot in the door’ of their respective careers... [read more]

The return of George Orwell and Big Brother’s war on Palestine, Ukraine and the truth

In his latest essay, John Pilger describes the liberal "one-way, legal/moral screen" behind which great power and its Orwellian propaganda ensure an impunity for war and deception, dependent on what Leni Riefenstahl called our "submissive void".... [read more]

President Obama Receives “Ambassador for Humanity” Award (Not Satire)

“It is forbidden to kill; therefore all murderers are punished unless they kill in large numbers and to the sound of trumpets.” (Voltaire, 1694-1778).... [read more]

Hungarians believe their politicians are corrupt

When Transparency International issued its report on election spending on Monday the section that captured the headlines was that showing that Fidesz would spend over double the legal limit – and get away with it. Fidesz stayed quiet on this revelation but needless to say the opposition parties took to the social media immediately, writes David Eade.... [read more]

Pakistan, terrorism and torture: How I was radicalised by the state

Mohammad Yahiya shares his personal experience of state terrorism and torture in this article... [read more]

Doctors and Drones 2014: Interview with Tomasz Pierscionek on the updated Medact Report

Journalist and researcher, Carol Anne Grayson, talks to Dr Tomasz Pierscionek about his involvement in campaigning against the use of armed drones ... [read more]

The JFK Conspiracy Theories and Why they Still Matter Today

It is now fifty years ago, come November 22nd, that John F Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas in an event that had a huge bearing on the course of history from that day on... [read more]

How we are gentrified, impoverished and silenced – if we allow it

Momentous change almost always begins with the courage of people taking back their own lives against the odds, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

For Whom the Cock Crows

Thomas Riggins discusses Marx's 1844 article on Hegel's philosophy of law... [read more]

Italy: an economy based on free labour

A leading phenomenon of the Italian job market is the ability of employers to rely on an abundant supply of free labour. Patrizia Bertini explains... [read more]

WikiLeaks is a rare truth-teller

WikiLeaks is a rare example of a newsgathering organisation that exposes the truth. Julian Assange is by no means alone, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Welcome to the Shammies, the media awards that recognise truly unsung talent

There are awards for everyone. There are the Logies, the Commies, the Tonys, the Theas, the Millies ("They cried with pride") and now the Shammies, writes John Pilger... [read more]

As Gaza is savaged again, understanding the BBC's historical role is vital

We must understand the BBC as a pre-eminent state propagandist and censor by omission, says John Pilger.... [read more]

Nuclear power, the energy of protest: The future could be renewable

With proper commitment and investment in renewable energy and a push towards an alternative model of development, the future need not resemble the past or indeed the increasingly catastrophic present, writes Colin Todhunter. ... [read more]

Spying an opportunity

Stephen Gilbert argues that surveillance over the whole population involves an erosion of our basic liberties. We give away our rights at our own peril. ... [read more]

Noncommittal for kindle or less than kind?

The Kindle - an infinity of reading or a bibliophile's nightmare? Stephen Gilbert shares his thoughts on the matter.... [read more]

The future for Tunisia

Thomas Riggins examines the background and ideology of the Ennanah Party, now heading the governing alliance in Tunisia following the overthrow of President Ben Ali ... [read more]

NONE SO BLIND - An outRageous! challenge

outRageous! lays down the gauntlet to all readers of the London Progressive Journal... [read more]

Penny Red – Notes from the New Age of Dissent

John Green reviews the latest book from an up and coming journalist who describes herself as a journalist, author, feminist, socialist, utopian, general reprobate and troublemaker... [read more]

The Assange case means we are all suspects now

John Pilger reveals the extent to which the White House will go to silence 'Whistleblowers' speaking the truth... [read more]

Divine Injustice

Drone warfare can be used to thwart democratic movements, anywhere, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

Lies, Damned Lies and Opinion Polls

Stephen Gilbert challenges the so called 'accuracy' of ICM opinion polls and shows how Labour continues to miss classic opportunities to rebut Conservative policy. ... [read more]

Christopher Hitchens - an obit and opinion

Amid the avalanche of articles and obituaries written in tribute to Christopher Hitchens in the wake of his recent passing, we have been reacquainted with the essential condition of western liberalism - moral depravity, says John Wight. ... [read more]

What a £ot of Balls!

outRageous! thinks sports have gone Doo-£ally!... [read more]

Taking a look at L.H.O.O.Q

outRageous! gives a critique of the first edition of L.H.O.O.Q- a new online culture magazine... [read more]

The lasting legacy of 9/11

Since the September 11 2001 attacks the world has witnessed the best and worst of humanity, writes John Wight.... [read more]

The Changing Face of the Egyptian Media

Iqbal Tamimi considers the challenges facing the Egyptian media in light of the recent political upheaval in that country. ... [read more]

Al Arabiya’s piracy and journalism’s codes of ethics

Iqbal Tamimi on the rights of journalists and photographers and the attempts by major news organisations to ride roughshod over them.... [read more]

Defending the NHS Against Privatisation: John Lister talks to London Progressive Journal (Part Two)

The second part of Tomasz Pierscionek's discussion with prominent anti-privatisation campaigner John Lister.... [read more]

Walled In

Science and humanities students view each other with incomprehension: blame our dumb, narrow schooling, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

The Biggest Lie in the World and a Few Truths

Steven Colatrella picks apart the myth that free market capitalism is the most rational way of allocating resources.... [read more]

Muslim Women Find Expression Through Cartoons

Iqbal Tamimi on how some Muslim women have overcome cultural marginalisation to express themselves through popular art.... [read more]

Book Review: Judith Butler, 'Frames of War'

Nathaniel Mehr reviews Judith Butler's thought-provoking examination of the ways in which identity and culture are manipulated in the interests of imperialism.... [read more]

Blue Desert

George Monbiot asks: Why is no one brave enough to stand up to the fishing industry? ... [read more]

Is the New Statesman Committing Suicide?

Examining a particularly unfortunate case of appalling journalism, Nathaniel Mehr wonders whether mainstream publications are complacent or just grossly out of touch.... [read more]

The Proceeds of Crime

The US and British governments have created a private prison industry which preys on human lives, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

US Imperialism Looks Beyond the Middle-East

Nathaniel Mehr on the latest round of sabre-rattling emanating from the United States.... [read more]

BBC Faces Challenge Over Ecuador Distortions

Samuele Mazzolini examines the misleading BBC documentary that has caused outrage among some of London's Ecuadorean community.... [read more]

Andean Crisis: Ecuador Rallies Latin American Support Against Colombian Incursion

Samuele Mazzolini with the latest on the diplomatic crisis between Ecuador and Colombia.... [read more]

Polish Community Hits Back At Daily Mail

Chris Bath on the Daily Mail's crass xenophobia.... [read more]