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The Subversive Vision of Patricia Highsmith

The release of the film ‘Carol’, based on Patricia Highsmith’s 1952 novel, ‘The Price of Salt’, gives us an opportunity to enter into the subversive world of one of the 20th century’s greatest popular writers... [read more]

Winston Churchill the Novelist

The fiftieth anniversary of Churchill's state funeral brings out the usual accolades as well as the customary recriminations... [read more]

Book review: Venceremos

Dr Tomasz Pierscionek reviews Howard Waxman\'s first novel- a political thriller called Venceremos... [read more]

The Invisible Diasporan (Part 1)

Mallards Cottage was where I wrote my first novel. I called it The Return. I used to dream most of its events – the very plot was born of a dream on Christmas Eve of 1976... [read more]

The End of Certainty

Stephen Chan, Professor of International Relations at the School of Oriental and African Studies, talks about the adventures that inspired his new book, 'The End of Certainty'.... [read more]

Out of it

John Green reviews Palestinian author Selma Dabbagh's debut novel... [read more]

Ne Les Oublions Jamais

David Eade recounts his experience of Holocaust Memorial Day in Paris... [read more]

Language of the Years

A poem by Dr Faysal Mikdadi... [read more]

International Relations and the Classroom

We in Britain are often subject to the age old criticism of being insular and self engrossed. Whereas this is not strictly speaking true, there is an element of truth in this belief... [read more]

A review of Anita's revolution

Linda Rogers reviews a novel by Shirley Langer, friend of Cuba and witness to the early years of the revolution... [read more]

Book of the Month: 'The Lacuna' by Barbara Kingsolver

John Green recommends this witty and evocative political novel set in 1930s Mexico.... [read more]

Alone Of All The Arts

Writing is the hand that feeds society’s conscience and consciousness. Writing examines life, the essential process of civilized awareness, the fuel of serious social discourse... [read more]

Central Bank Digital Currencies: A Revolution in Banking?

Several central banks, including the Bank of England, the People’s Bank of China, the Bank of Canada and the Federal Reserve, are exploring the concept of issuing their own digital currencies... [read more]

The CIA, Torture, and American “Democracy”

The Senate report on CIA torture reads like a Stephen King novel, a transcript from the Nuremberg trials, or Josef Mengele’s notes from Auschwitz... [read more]

Give and take in the EU-US trade deal? Sure. We give, the corporations take

I have three challenges for the architects of a proposed transatlantic trade deal. If they reject them, they reject democracy, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Waiting for Mangabe or Slavoj Zizek on Mandela's Socialist Failure

This is a reply to Slavoj Zizek's article "Mandela's Socialist Failure" published online in The Stone (a New York Times maintained philosophy blog) on December 6, 2013... [read more]

From Ragged Trousered Philanthropists to Label Wearing Ostriches?

Frank Owen, the lead character in Robert Tressell’s novel The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, expressed his frustration at the dismissive response of his fellow workers to his arguments for a better society... [read more]

Literacy Skills: A Basic Human Right

Shirley Langer, author of 'Anita's revolution', lived and worked in Cuba for almost five years in the mid 1960s. She describes how, after the revolution, Cubans managed to eradicate illiteracy in a matter of months.... [read more]

Noncommittal for kindle or less than kind?

The Kindle - an infinity of reading or a bibliophile's nightmare? Stephen Gilbert shares his thoughts on the matter.... [read more]

A Ghost Story Retailed (part two)

W Stephen Gilbert delivers an up-to-date, state and fate of the retail trade in Britain, it is partly warmingly, personal and anecdotal, and partly a critical overview: part two...... [read more]

Central Banks Have Gone Rogue, Putting Us All At Risk

Central bankers are now aggressively playing the stock market. To say they are buying up the planet may be an exaggeration, but they could. They can create money at will, and they have declared their independence from government. They have become rogue players in a game of their own.... [read more]

WE ARE ALL CITIZENS OF EVERYWHERE

Migration is natural. Like many I can claim age-old ancestry of one place, yet equally there are those roots in distant places, and a history of migrations across seas and continents even in recent years... [read more]

A Writer's Place

It was a masterpiece of evasion. He was asked, as other writers were, to comment on the needs of publishers to seek out work of merit that might not be commercially viable... [read more]

Pickled Cucumbers

Hallelujah! At long last I have found a point on which I agree with Binyamin Netanyahu. Really!... [read more]

Kaya, the royal Dog

The spectacle is almost bizarre: a political party refuses to accept new members. And not just a few individuals, but tens of thousands... [read more]

Eyeless in Gaza

The atrocity goes on. Two million human beings suffer inhuman treatment. And the world? Alas. the world is busy. It has no eyes for Gaza. Better not to think about that awful place... [read more]

Danegeld

It was just over a thousand years ago that the King of England shook his piggy bank and found it full of twigs and trinkets. He needed dosh and he needed it fast.... [read more]

Lebanon Has a Few Stragglers Living There

As ever in life, there were compensations that made life tolerable despite many difficulties.... [read more]

Iran as the Historical Tri-Continental Bridge, and Ireland? An Ethno-Cultural and Etymological Interconnectedness

Over forty years ago, a number of Irish professors visiting the University of Tehran disseminated their research findings that there is a firm anthropological connection between Iran and Ireland from the distant past... [read more]

An Old Palestinian Heart still Beats on

A poem by Dr Faysal Mikdadi... [read more]

Brexit has its day in court!

The third day of November 2016 was an historic day for parliamentary democracy. It was a day on which an investment fund manager and a hairdresser took on the might of the UK government in the High Court and won... [read more]

The Neon Demon – a cult classic in the making

Breaking taboos is the big yawn of our modern commerce dominated culture so I hesitate to recommend a movie that seems, superficially at least, to be gratuitously designed to break as many taboos as is conceivably possible... [read more]

Hatred Unlimited

Absent all chances for a serious effort for peace, hatred will just grow and grow, until it engulfs us all... [read more]

Humans, Dancers, Travel and Fight Club

Air travel is one of humanity’s main technological advancements thus far, but does it make us more or less ‘human’?... [read more]

When God Despairs

God is shaking his head. These humans, He asks Himself, will they never learn... [read more]

Fear of Assimilation

The Israeli Ministry of Education has struck a book from students' reading list. The cardinal sin was the plot: a love story between a Jewish girl and an Arab boy... [read more]

Illegal Slaughter – Cameron’s Syria Equals Blair’s Iraq?

A recent ITV poll showed 89.32% of British people are against bombing Syria... [read more]

Mission Civilisatrice: Piketty et Houellebecq

We have so much to learn from the French. If only we could understand what they are saying half the time... [read more]

Divide et Impera

Binyamin Netanyahu is not known as a classical scholar, but even so he has adopted the Roman maxim Divide et Impera, divide and rule.... [read more]

The Riderless Horse

There were events in 1951 which helped shape the subsequent history of much of the world... [read more]

California Water Wars: Another Form of Asset Stripping?

In California’s epic drought, wars over water rights continue, while innovative alternatives for increasing the available water supply go untapped... [read more]

Economic Policies for an Incoming Labour Government (Part 6 of 9)

The No-Cost Keynesian Stimulation of Demand in the Economy ... [read more]

My Glorious Brothers

When I was 15 years old and a member of the Irgun underground (by today's criteria, an honest-to-goodness terrorist organization), we sang "(In the past) we had the heroes / Bar Kochba and the Maccabees / Now we have the new ones / The national youth…"... [read more]

Monsanto, Syngenta, Pioner et al: With Friends in High Places, the GMO Biotech Sector is Kicking Open the Door to Europe

The proposal to hand back some decision powers to member states of the European Union regarding GMO approvals is currently being discussed, writes Colin Todhunter... [read more]

Bread and Circuses in a Digital Age

Bread and circuses have always been a central aspect of ruling class hegemony and a means of keeping the masses in a soporific state... [read more]

Socialism and Christianity

David Benbow compares the tenets of Christianity with Socialist theory... [read more]

What It Is Like Being Invisible

"Someone must have traduced Joseph K., for without having done anything wrong he was arrested one fine morning"... [read more]

The year we did our best to abandon the natural world

Emissions are rising, ice is melting and yet the response of governments is simply to pretend that none of it is happening, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

Call Mr Robeson – a Life with Songs

John Green writes about the life and work of one of America’s greatest singers who was ‘disappeared’ from public life and airbrushed out of the history books... [read more]

Review - Health Care Reform and Globalisation: The US, China and Europe in Comparative Perspective

David Lane reviews a book which illustrates the global nature of developments in healthcare: Health Care Reform and Globalisation: The US, China and Europe in Comparative Perspective... [read more]

Review: The Master

OK, I saw "The Master." Now I know what the fuss is about. I don't pretend to know the film's "message" but I walked out afterward seeing/feeling the world from its point of view, writes Jean Claude van Italie.... [read more]

Condemnation partly motivated by hindsight

The condemnation of past behaviours has become fashionable. It is partly motivated by hindsight. It is also partly motivated by sheer outrage, as any decent and humane person cannot help but be outraged by man's often barbaric treatment of other human beings, writes Elizabeth Ellis.... [read more]

The Rest is Hasbara: Jenny Tonge’s Victory over the Lobby

Baroness Tonge, spoke at the House of Lords in January 2009 of the "impotence of the international community, not just in Gaza, but…over 40 years of occupation of Palestine by Israel," Ramzy Baroud explains further.... [read more]

An outRageous! essay on The Arts, Education and The People.

This rant is aimed at your crassness, Cameron. It goes to the heart of what is art, and why it's so important in preparing people for democracy, says outRageous!... [read more]

The Sacrificial Caste

In this and other nations, there are groups of children who can be abused with impunity, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

A Conservative Christmas Carol

The London Progressive Journal gives its take on current events in the latest fortnightly editorial... [read more]

Legoviews ~ Goodbye yellow brick road!

In the first of her interviews using the novel 'Lego Serious Play' method, Patrizia Bertini speaks to one of the occupiers at the OccupyLSX camp.... [read more]

What a £ot of Balls!

outRageous! thinks sports have gone Doo-£ally!... [read more]

Slash and Burn Capitalism

Now the government intends to strip away protection from our most treasured places, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

Obit: Never a Soft or quiet Russell

W Stephen Gilbert pays tribute to Ken Russell, the enigmatic, eccentric film director who died on Sunday. ... [read more]

Wealth Destroyers

The Corporation of the City of London has harmed you more than you know, says George Monbiot. ... [read more]

To the river...

Emmeline Ravilious reviews Olivia Laing\'s latest book \'To the River\'... [read more]

How the Billionaires Broke the System

The US deficit reduction plan makes no sense – until you remember who’s behind the Tea Party movement. ... [read more]

Book review: The Tolpuddle Boy

John Green reviews "The Tolpuddle Boy", a timely tribute to the struggles of early trade unionism.... [read more]

‘Dying to Win’: Newt Gingrich’s ‘Terrorism’

Bush may be gone, but right-wingers in the US are still exploiting public fears of terrorism to pursue their foreign policy agenda, as Ramzy Baroud explains.... [read more]

Book Publishers Should Embrace the Digital Age

Publishing can - and should - adapt to the changing technological landscape, writes John Oakes. ... [read more]

The Real Climate Scandal

A scandal over faked evidence has been a boon to climate change deniers. George Monbiot looks to redress the balance.... [read more]

Should We Seek to Save Industrial Civilisation? A Debate with Paul Kingsnorth

Guardian journalist George Monbiot discusses climate change with the Oxford-based environmentalist Paul Kingsnorth.... [read more]

Genetic Modification: A Pandora's Box

Tomasz Pierscionek dissects the arguments on both sides of the GM controversy.... [read more]

The Proceeds of Crime

The US and British governments have created a private prison industry which preys on human lives, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

The Open Veins of Wales

Guardian journalist George Monbiot on his love for his adopted country.... [read more]

Gordon Brown and "Light Touch" Regulation

Mick Brooks on how Gordon’s policies left the UK unprepared for the present financial crisis.... [read more]

Brown Inches Closer to Ingsoc

Tom Bangay on why Brown's Britain is sleepwalking into a surveillance society.... [read more]

Cuba's "Green Revolution" an Example to Follow

As part of our ongoing series celebrating the impending 50th anniversary of the Cuban revolution, Tomasz Pierscionek examines Cuba's approach to the struggle for environmental conservation and sustainability.... [read more]

The Magic Pudding

George Monbiot on why the US government still pouring billions into missile defence.... [read more]