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Call Mr Robeson – a Life with Songs

John Green writes about the life and work of one of America’s greatest singers who was ‘disappeared’ from public life and airbrushed out of the history books... [read more]

Khaled Taja: The Anthony Quinn of Arab Drama

Khaled Taja, 70 years old and the iconic figure of Arabic drama, is planning to play the leading role in a movie about the tunnels of Gaza, writes Iqbal Tamimi.... [read more]


By common consent (at least among those like me who lived through it), the ‘golden age’ of broadcasting – at the BBC especially – was that which spanned the 1960s, writes W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]

The Kangaroo

A year into his presidency, Barack Obama has achieved relatively little in the foreign policy sphere. Uri Avnery urges him to keep trying.... [read more]

Clintonites Prepare for War on Syria

Neoconservatives including Clintonites are pushing hard for a direct US attack on Syria to prevent the collapse of their regime change project... [read more]

Twelve Years a Slave, Sixty Six Years a Living Dead

Dr Faysal Mikdadi dreams of his lost love - Palestine... [read more]

A journey into the vice-ridden world of banking

The primary objective of the world’s leaders is to avoid another banking and financial crash that could be worse than the one in September 2008... [read more]

Making the World Safe for Banksters: Syria in the Cross-hairs

In an August 2013, journalist Greg Palast posted evidence of a secret late-1990s plan devised by Wall Street ans US Treasury officials to open banking to the lucrative derivatives business... [read more]

Lenin on "Reactionary" Trade Unions: Chapter Six of "Left-Wing" Communism: an Infantile Disorder

In his latest article analysing “Left-Wing” Communism: an Infantile Disorder, Thomas Riggins looks at Lenin's views on what sort of relations a Marxist party should have with the trade union movement... [read more]

Camping Needs Solid Ground

LPJ's arts correspondent and resident philosopher, Stephen Gilbert, comments that an emphasis on celebrity is the prevailing television flavour of the age, infecting every genre of programming, whether appropriate or not... [read more]

Don’t Quota Me

Is there a single reputable argument in favour of positive discrimination? The fact that so many of our institutions are unrepresentative of the make-up of society is of course deplorable, but manipulating recruitment in order to create an artificial balance is no way to put this right, writes W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]

Legoviews ~ Goodbye yellow brick road!

In the first of her interviews using the novel 'Lego Serious Play' method, Patrizia Bertini speaks to one of the occupiers at the OccupyLSX camp.... [read more]

The Case for an Impartial Turkish Inquiry

As Israel gets on with its whitewash inquiry into the flotilla attack, Ahmed Amr calls for a genuine and impartial investigation.... [read more]

Unscripted: Green Zone Theatre and the Shoe Drama

Ramzy Baroud on how Muntadhar al-Zaidi's shoe-throwing intervention served to pierce, however momentarily, the veil of stage-managed deception which characterises Nuri al-Maliki's Iraq.... [read more]

UK Government Bribes its Way to Climate Change

Despite falling apart at the seams over its Brexit ‘negotiations’ with the EU, and its internal fights and scandals, bringing shame and embarrassment to the UK, Theresa May’s government is determined to carry on with its money-oriented and earth-trashing policies... [read more]

And Where is Glastonbury?

The hope is that we wake up to something within our grasp at last.... [read more]

The Invisible Diasporan (Part 1)

Mallards Cottage was where I wrote my first novel. I called it The Return. I used to dream most of its events – the very plot was born of a dream on Christmas Eve of 1976... [read more]

What the Hell

What the hell has happened to them? Have they gone crazy? The British, of all people?... [read more]

The BBC – a flawed institution but worth preserving

The Tories must not be allowed to destroy the BBC. For all its flaws, it is well worth preserving... [read more]

Corbyn – A Very British Story

Nowhere else in the world of politics, other than in Britain, is there or could there be a Jeremy Corbyn... [read more]

The Israeli Salvation Front

The 2015 election was a giant step towards the self-destruction of Israel. An Israel Salvation Front is needed now.... [read more]


A tale of lost innocence by John Lane... [read more]

The G20 Leaders Communique′

Mark Horner critically reviews four major themes of the G20 Leaders Communique... [read more]

Oil, Blood, Confusion, Fear: Fuelling The British Public's Appetite For War

Back in 2003, Tony Blair stated that Saddam Hussein could hit Britain with a missile within 45 minutes. He also said that Iraq possessed weapons of mass destruction... [read more]

So, after the IPCC report, which bit of the world are you prepared to lose?

George Monbiot asks: When people say we should adjust to climate change, do they understand what that actually means?... [read more]

Waiting for Mangabe or Slavoj Zizek on Mandela's Socialist Failure

This is a reply to Slavoj Zizek's article "Mandela's Socialist Failure" published online in The Stone (a New York Times maintained philosophy blog) on December 6, 2013... [read more]

Bankocracy: from the Venetian Republic to Mario Draghi and Goldman Sachs

From the 12th century to the beginning of the 14th, the Knights Templar, present in much of Europe, had become the bankers for the powerful and had taken part in the financing of several crusades... [read more]

For Whom the Cock Crows

Thomas Riggins discusses Marx's 1844 article on Hegel's philosophy of law... [read more]

Everything is information, you have to choose. An interview with Jean-Philippe Tremblay

Patrizia Bertini interviews Canadian film director Jean-Philippe Tremblay using the Lego Serious Play (LSP) method... [read more]

“Palestine’s existence depends on respect and on our children” - Dr Rauf Azar (Director of the Beit Sahour medical centre)

Patrizia Bertini interviews Rauf Azar, a Palestinian doctor, using the pioneering Lego Serious Play technique... [read more]

The teratoid of US foreign policy

Since the United States Declaration of Independence in 1776, the US has struggled with its foreign policy and its perceived role within global politics. Finn Bowen discusses the past, present and future of US foreign policy... [read more]

Charity Economics, Subservient Politics: Why Oslo Must Go

Recent demonstrations in protest of the rising cost of living have swept across the West Bank. While they are not indicative of a Palestinian version of the ‘Arab Spring’, they are still an important first step, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

The true 'creatives' - let them eat cake? Or, in India, poor quality rice

The LPJ's India correspondent, Colin Todhunter, describes how India's true wealth creators are increasingly sidelined as temples to global capitalism spring up across the country... [read more]

Memory in Exile: An Interview with Jorge Coulon of Inti Illimani

Ramona Wadi speaks with a member of the famous Chilean band Inti Illimani, a group that was part of the nueva cancion movement in the 60s and 70s... [read more]

NONE SO BLIND - An outRageous! challenge

outRageous! lays down the gauntlet to all readers of the London Progressive Journal... [read more]

Ain't football great

In the first LPJ sports column, Felix McHugh gives a rundown of events in the world of football... [read more]

Slavery for Dummies - Part 2

Part 2 of an analysis by OutRageous! looking at the slavery endemic in our modern society.... [read more]

Modern Football: Money, Hype and Hysteria

John Green looks at how the status of the 'beautiful game' has changed in recent years.... [read more]

European Elections and Year Ahead: The Threat of the BNP

Christopher Vasey considers the ominous prospect of a far right success in the forthcoming European elections.... [read more]

Pakistan: Civilians Paying the Price for the 'War on Terror'

Assed Baig on the humanitarian tragedy resulting from join US-Pakistani military actions in the border regions of Pakistan.... [read more]

Support the Iranian People, Oppose Tehran’s Clerical Fascism

Peter Tatchell believes the left should unite against the theocratic regime in Tehran.... [read more]

The Tempo of the Struggle

Socialist Appeal's Terry McPartlan provides a Marxist analysis of the current financial crisis.... [read more]

Safety Initiatives are Criminalising Young People

As a new curfew is scheme is tried out in Cornwall, Matt Genner argues that such policies will only ostracise young people and perpetuate a culture of fear and isolation.... [read more]

A Sporting Chance: Why the Olympics is a Perfect Arena for Protest

Alexa Van Sickle on the significane of the Olympic protests.... [read more]

Nation, language, culture - play things of the elites?

One vital aspect of Globalisation is that local wage traditions, built up over centuries of trade union struggles by the working class, have to give way to cheap labour that moves at the speed of money around the globe to satisfy the needs of multinational companies. Cheap labour has been achieved by making wars and creating a refugee crisis... [read more]

Donald Trump and Theresa May - Partners in Planning Armageddon?

Prime Minister May’s endlessly repeated mantra “Brexit means Brexit” (Britain leaving the European Union) takes on a whole new meaning: she is prepared to trigger the UK departing the planet.... [read more]

Open Letter to the World Anti Doping Agency and International Olympic Committee Regarding the McLaren Report and the Politicization of Doping in Sports

Russian track and field athletes, plus the entire Paralympics team, were banned from the Rio Games last summer. This was based on the first McLaren report commissioned by the World Anti Doping Agency (WADA).... [read more]

Nowruz, the Persian New Year at the spring vernal equinox

Nowruz in Persian literally means the first day [of the New Year]. It is the most prominent seasonal celebration of the solar calendars... [read more]

Power Will Be Restored

Would or could a different leader of this or that have altered the prospect of past, present or future... [read more]

“Confronting China”: John Pilger Talks about His New Film, America’s ‘Pivot to Asia’, and the Role of Japan and Australia

T.J. Coles, author of Britain’s Secret Wars talks to multi-awarded-winning journalist, author and filmmaker, John Pilger, about his new documentary, The Coming War on China... [read more]

Realism on the World Stage

A poem by Dr Faysal Mikdadi... [read more]

The Great Railway Scandal

I am not the envious type, but I envy the Germans. I envy them for Angela Merkel... [read more]


In the northern coastal villages of Hako Constituency on Buka Island, in Papua New Guinea’s eastern autonomous region of Bougainville, life to all appearances is carefree... [read more]

Business As Unusual

We need more people to throw down their swords and raise their voices with the healing words of true democracy... [read more]

Night-time in Brexit

A poem by Nicola Jackson... [read more]

Two Natanz-es? The One I Eternally Adore Is . . . Real!

Natanz is the name of the ancient and tranquil township whose otherwise noble name has been excessively abused by the Western and US media circus in the past decade... [read more]

Squaring the Circle

This week, President Rivlin published a peace plan. That is not a usual act by a president, whose office is mainly ceremonial.... [read more]

In the Panama Capers we Trust

The leaked Panama Papers, from the Panamanian law firm Mossack Fonseca & Co, are spilling the beans on the details of what the rich, powerful and greedy get up to with unseemly amounts of dosh... [read more]

What Happened to the Jews?

A new generation of Jews in America is turning their backs on Israel altogether... [read more]

Nowruz, the Persian New Year at the spring vernal equinox

Nowruz in Persian literally means the first day [of the New Year]. It is the most prominent seasonal celebration of the solar calendars... [read more]

Obama, Putin and the US Election

Why is Obama deliberately stirring up old Cold War tensions with Russia by ordering saber rattling by the Pentagon and our puppet military alliance NATO?... [read more]

Polls versus principles

"How sad if Labour’s courage should fail it, so that it lags behind progressive opinion, just as a new mainstream is developing." A commentary by Bryan Gould, former Labour shadow cabinet minister... [read more]

Fear of Assimilation

The Israeli Ministry of Education has struck a book from students' reading list. The cardinal sin was the plot: a love story between a Jewish girl and an Arab boy... [read more]

A Crisis Worse than ISIS? Bail-Ins Begin

While the mainstream media focus on ISIS extremists, a threat that has gone virtually unreported is that your life savings could be wiped out in a massive derivatives collapse. Bank bail-ins have begun in Europe, and the infrastructure is in place in the US... [read more]

Illegal Slaughter – Cameron’s Syria Equals Blair’s Iraq?

A recent ITV poll showed 89.32% of British people are against bombing Syria... [read more]

Cameron’s Strategic Defence and Security Review and the New Cold War

Every state that ever existed in world history has sought to justify its actions abroad by claiming that it is has the moral right and justice on its side... [read more]

One day

A poem by John Gohorry... [read more]

Islam's Trojan Horse

Over the last two years, there has been a worrying increase is Islamophobia... [read more]

The Inverted World of Niall Ferguson: On the Real Obama Doctrine

Niall Ferguson has a very conservative world outlook which, when applied to the analysis of current social reality, has a tendency to so warp his perceptions that the situation he writes about becomes an imaginary inverted world... [read more]

What if David Cameron is a Gerrymandering PM?

Frankie Boyle the Scottish comedian used the Comment is Free section of the Guardian to ask the question “What if David Cameron is an Evil Genius?”... [read more]

Even Dictators

A poem by Gareth Writer-Davies... [read more]

The Magician's Apprentice

One has to choose: Binyamin Netanyahu is either incredibly shrewd or incredibly foolish... [read more]

On the way to the Boardroom

A poem by John Gohorry... [read more]

A Corbyn leadership

Bryan Gould, former Labour shadow cabinet minister, asks how left-wing is Jeremy Corbyn... [read more]


A poem from Dr Faysal Mikdadi... [read more]

Ideological reforms vs Greek democracy

Bryan Gould, former Labour shadow cabinet minister, explains how Europe is witnessing a triumph of ideology over common sense ... [read more]

Who Will Save Israel

The battle is over. The dust has settled. A new government – partly ridiculous, partly terrifying – has been installed ... [read more]

A Day and Night-mare

Binyamin Netanyahu seems to be detested now by everyone... [read more]

Modern Ukraine RIP (Born 1991- Died 2014)

Dr Tomasz Pierscionek explains how Ukraine, as it once was, no longer exists... [read more]

Now for the Rise of the Republic of The North!

It’s not only the Scots who are disillusioned with Westminster politics. The 2015 election once again doomed the north to five more years under a leadership it hasn’t voted for... [read more]

Just when hope and courage are called for, Labour promises bean-counting

Labour’s focus on cutting the deficit means progressive voters will have to look elsewhere for inspiration, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

An Iranian model of altruism, volunteerism, philanthropy and scholarship in the Diaspora

The devotion of one’s intellectual and material resources to the betterment of human society has been emphasized in Persian literature, culture and religions since the earliest times... [read more]

Nowruz, the New Year at the spring vernal equinox

Nowruz in Persian literally means the first day... [read more]

Obama’s 2015 State of the Union Address: “That’s Not Who we Are”

Borrowing from Hollywood-themed awards ceremonies, political theatre was taken to new lows with Obama’s sixth State of the Union speech to the US Congress on January 20th... [read more]

EU Showdown: Greece Takes on the Vampire Squid

Greece and the troika (the International Monetary Fund, the EU, and the European Central Bank) are in a dangerous game of chicken... [read more]

Niall Ferguson on Henry Kissinger's "World Order"

A good book review gives both the gist of the book and allows you to decide if it is worth reading... [read more]

What GMOs Are Really About: Profits, Power and Geopolitics

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are not essential for feeding the world... [read more]

Menace on the Menu: Development and the Globalization of Servitude‏ (Part 2)

Me-first acquisitiveness is now pervasive throughout the upper strata of society... [read more]

The Plebiscite

Israelis are fed up with Binyamin Netanyahu. They are fed up with the government. They are fed up with all political parties. They are fed up with themselves. They are fed up... [read more]

On gloves, rubber and the spatio-temporal logics of global health

Over the last decades and not least through the UN’s Millennium Development Goals, health initiatives have received unprecedented attention and funding... [read more]

The Dangers of Form Agnosia

Kate Zagoskina describes the West's tendency to shut its eyes to the bigger picture and ignore the link between action and consequence... [read more]

Ah, If I Were 25

Recently, Haaretz columnist Ari Shavit has written an article in which he equally condemns “extreme rightists” and “extreme leftists”, those who advocate war and those who advocate peace... [read more]

God Wills It!

For six decades my friends and I have warned our people: if we don't make peace with the nationalist Arab forces, we shall be faced with Islamic Arab forces ... [read more]

Lenin: State and Revolution: Withering Away the State

Thomas Riggins reviews the first part of Chapter V of Lenin's State and Revolution (1917)... [read more]

The history and modern role of political Islam

After the collapse of the Soviet Union and the capitalist counter-revolution in China, an immense political vacuum opened up in ideology and politics on a world scale. Article by Dr Lal Khan... [read more]

Washington's madness in Ukraine

What is happening right now in Ukraine may not just be another conflict that will rumble on for a few years and then slowly end in a messy compromise... [read more]

Bury my Heart at Gaza City

The similarities between the building of Israel and the US are astonishing. The native people are portrayed as savage, inherently violent, unable to understand peace... [read more]

Challenges to the rights of sexual minorities in Africa

A Ugandan Catholic priest analyses the reasons for the existence of homophobia in Africa... [read more]

Meeting in a Tunnel

The Israeli media are now totally subservient. There is no independent reporting. "Military correspondents" are not allowed into Gaza to see for themselves, they are willingly reduced to parroting army communiqués, presenting them as their personal observations... [read more]

Lenin on the State and Revolution: The Paris Commune (1871)

Thomas Riggins reviews Chapter IV of Lenin's State and Revolution (1917)... [read more]

The return of George Orwell and Big Brother’s war on Palestine, Ukraine and the truth

In his latest essay, John Pilger describes the liberal "one-way, legal/moral screen" behind which great power and its Orwellian propaganda ensure an impunity for war and deception, dependent on what Leni Riefenstahl called our "submissive void".... [read more]

Goal Moscow

The USA wants to turn Ukraine into a permanent area of crisis, keeping it just off the boil of war. In this way Russia will feel threatened... [read more]

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, A Thatcherite Revolution: “Free Trade”, Corporate Plunder and the War on Working People

Prior to the recent national elections in India, there were calls for a Thatcherite revolution to fast-track the country towards privatisation and neo-liberalism... [read more]

Chagos: Britain, the CIA and Diego Garcia – Something fishy going on?

My attention was drawn by chance to another article on Diego Garcia in the Independent stating that the government must renegotiate with US over the use of the island for rendition flights.... [read more]

Acquiescing to Big Biotech: The Deceptions and Falsehoods of the GMO Lobby

British Environment Secretary Owen Paterson is a staunch supporter of the GMO sector despite mounting evidence pointing to the deleterious health, social, ecological and environmental impacts of GMOs... [read more]

Syria and Ukraine: Two Elections, Diplomatic Shenanigans, Double Standards and Insurgents

Thursday 15th May marked Nakba Day, Yawm an-Nakba, “Day of Catastrophe”: the onset of the displacement of perhaps 800,000 Palestinians... [read more]

The emergence of separatist movements in Pakistan

We have undergone two martial law regimes since the National Assembly adopted the 1973 Constitution. The 1973 Constitution failed to transform Pakistan into an economic success... [read more]

Banks bluff in a completely legal way

Part 8 of Eric Toussaint's series Banks Versus The People: The Underside Of A Rigged Game!... [read more]

What can we do with what Thomas Piketty teaches us about capital in the twenty-first century? (Part 2 of 2)

Part 2 of Eric Toussaint's review of Thomas Piketty book Capital in the Twenty-First Century... [read more]

Bread and Circuses in a Digital Age

Bread and circuses have always been a central aspect of ruling class hegemony and a means of keeping the masses in a soporific state... [read more]

'Good' and 'Bad' war - and the struggle of memory against forgetting

The regime that Washington created in the South, the “good” Korea, was set up and run largely by those who had collaborated with Japan and America, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

'Good and Bad' war - and the struggle of memory against forgetting

The regime that Washington created in the South, the “good” Korea, was set up and run largely by those who had collaborated with Japan and America, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

PTSD: From pain to purpose, US veterans Hart and Ethan speak out

I don’t claim to be any expert on rap music but seeing a photo of Snoop Dog in a smart jacket at the White House in the company of Obama was a bit of a let down... [read more]

In India, a spectre for us all, and a resistance coming

Neoliberalism has failed the vast majority of India's people. But the spirit that gave the nation independence is stirring, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Doctors and Drones 2014: Interview with Tomasz Pierscionek on the updated Medact Report

Journalist and researcher, Carol Anne Grayson, talks to Dr Tomasz Pierscionek about his involvement in campaigning against the use of armed drones ... [read more]

The Disenchantment Of British Voters With Democracy

Former MP and member of the Labour shadow cabinet, Bryan Gould, explains the need for politicians to restore public faith in the value of government and democracy in order to cure voter disaffection ... [read more]

Russell Brand and the Nixon inequality shock

Russell Brand's call for revolution reverberated with many beyond the underclass he referenced... [read more]

A Modest Proposal for the Improvement of the Younger Generation

It is a most distressing sight to see various education ministers and other self seeking professionals falling over each other to gain credit at the expense of so many poor teachers and their most unfortunate children... [read more]

The Banks, Fragile Giants

Part 5 of Eric Toussaint's series Banks versus the People: the Underside of a Rigged Game shows that big banks continue playing with fire, because they are persuaded that governments will save them whenever necessary... [read more]

The JFK Conspiracy Theories and Why they Still Matter Today

It is now fifty years ago, come November 22nd, that John F Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas in an event that had a huge bearing on the course of history from that day on... [read more]

The US Role and Iran in Southwest Asia

Déjà vu all over again: US foreign policy has once again arrived at a critical historical crossroad... [read more]

One of the truest journalists is a cartoonist armed with a penguin

Steve Bell is a contemporary Hogarth, with a touch of Peter Sellers, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Marxism is Real Naturalism: Galen Strawson and Panpsychism

Sartre once remarked that the attempt to construct a philosophy that goes beyond Marxism simply recreates a pre-Marxist view that is no longer relevant to current understanding... [read more]

Greek Capitalism at a Critical Point

Greek capitalism continues to be the weak link of the Eurozone as it is still under the “intensive care” of the EU support mechanisms for the fourth consecutive year and is in recession for the sixth consecutive year... [read more]

From Hiroshima to Syria, the enemy whose name we dare not speak

John Pilger writes that regardless of diplomatic attempts to delay an attack on Syria, the US objective has nothing to do with chemical weapons and everything to do with wiping out the last independent states in the Middle East.... [read more]

Currently Mistaken Ideas in Western Economics and Their Suggested Corrections (preferably soon) Part 2

Economist George Tait Edwards straightens out some of the economic myths taught at Western universities (Part 2 of 2)... [read more]

A Tale of Two Prime Ministers

George Tait Edwards comments on the comparisons and contrasts between the policies and personalities of Shinzo Abe, the Prime Minster of Japan, and David Cameron, the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom... [read more]

International Relations and the Classroom

We in Britain are often subject to the age old criticism of being insular and self engrossed. Whereas this is not strictly speaking true, there is an element of truth in this belief... [read more]

The Failure of Innovation in the Anglo-Saxon Economies

George Tait Edwards examines the role of innovation in economic development... [read more]

Resurrecting woolly mammoths is exciting – but it's a fantasy

De-extinction sounds like a great idea. But there’s a problem most people have overlooked, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Marxism, the Taliban and Plato

Recently Simon Blackburn, the well known British philosopher, reviewed "Knowing Right from Wrong," the new book by Kieran Setiya, in the TLS... [read more]

The Key Relevance of the Writings of Professor Kenneth Kenkichi Kurihara

George Tait Edwards explains how the writings of economist Kenneth Kurihara serve as the gateway to understanding Shimomuran high-growth economics ... [read more]

The Italian crisis and the wait for Godot

A crisis is a crucial point, a turning point, a situation that demands change or reaction in order to resolve the situation... [read more]

Trident: A deterrent or a massive waste of money?

The true social democratic heirs of Hugh Gaitstkell would be, and are, opposed to the EU. Less well-known, but no less important, is that they ought to be opposed to nuclear weapons... [read more]

Slavko Martinov: The antidote to Propaganda? Question everything!

Patrizia Bertini conducts an exclusive interview with film producer Slavko Martinov... [read more]

Bulgaria elections: Widespread abuse but hope

I set off to Bulgaria after being selected by the Party of European Socialists to be part of the 100 plus team from all across the European Union to monitor the General Election. David Eade reports.... [read more]

The Counter-Enlightenment

What happens to people when they become government science advisers? Are their children taken hostage? Is a dossier of compromising photographs kept, ready to send to the Sun if they step out of line? George Monbiot writes.... [read more]

You are now leaving Working England, Welcome to Middle England: The socio-economic underachievement of Neo-Liberalism in attaining reduced class disparity

Since the economic reform of the 1980’s, politicians like Blair, Thatcher and Prescott absolutely believe that the working class no longer exists and the majority of UK citizens are now middle class, writes Elijah Pryor.... [read more]

It Can Happen Here: The Bank Confiscation Scheme for US and UK Depositors

Confiscating the customer deposits in Cyprus banks, it seems, was not a one-off, desperate idea of a few Eurozone “troika” officials scrambling to salvage their balance sheets reveals Ellen Brown... [read more]

Reading Lenin: Materialism and Empiro-criticism

Part 2 of Thomas Riggins' analysis of Lenin's Materialism and Empiro-criticism... [read more]

Secrets of the Rich

Billionaires are hiding behind a network of “independent” groups, who manipulate politics on their behalf, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Iraq Ten Years On: What You Don’t Hear!

10 years on from the invasion of Iraq, Hussein Al-Alak examines the long term psychological effects of the occupation... [read more]

Ne Les Oublions Jamais

David Eade recounts his experience of Holocaust Memorial Day in Paris... [read more]

A move to the centre

Uri Avnery provides an analysis of the Israeli election results... [read more]

You are now leaving Working England, Welcome to Middle England: The socio-economic underachievement of Neo-Liberalism in attaining reduced class disparity

Since the economic reform of the 1980’s, politicians like Blair, Thatcher and Prescott absolutely believe that the working class no longer exists and the majority of UK citizens are now middle class, writes Elijah Pryor. SOFT EDIT - ER 17/01/13... [read more]

Out of it

John Green reviews Palestinian author Selma Dabbagh's debut novel... [read more]

Australia and Asylum Seekers: Media Perspectives

The issue is not 'boat people' but imperialist expansion explains Finn Bowen ... [read more]

Obituary: Colonial officer, overseas aid administrator and champion of the oppressed who advanced the cause of gay people in the Civil Service'

Richard Kirker remembers Ian Buist: the quintessential Civil Service mandarin, but also a doughty proponent of social progress. He had a fearless determination to champion the rights of the victims of injustice, minorities and the marginalised.... [read more]

Obituary: Colonial officer, overseas aid administrator and champion of the oppressed who advanced the cause of gay people in the Civil Service'

Ian Buist: Ian Buist, CB, colonial officer, overseas aid administrator and champion of human and gay rights, was born on May 30, 1930. He died on October 19, 2012, aged 82, remembered by Richard Kirker.... [read more]

The Kurds and Human Rights

David Morgan asks what the Kurdish people have to celebrate as International Human Rights’ Day 2012 approaches... [read more]

Palestine Entangled: The Politics of Money

The link between political statements and action, and money is obvious for all to see. What may appear as political concessions can oftentimes be attributed to some frozen or funds waiting to be delivered. It is transaction-based politics at its best, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

The circulating money supply: Why QE3 won’t jumpstart the Economy—and What Would

The economy could use a good dose of “aggregate demand”—new spending money in the pockets of consumers — but QE3 won’t do it. Neither will it trigger the dreaded hyperinflation. In fact, it won’t do much at all. There are better alternatives, argues Ellen Brown.... [read more]

Football: Pay over pride?

Miles Caston asks whether contemporary football is all about money... [read more]

How the chosen ones ended Australia's sporting prowess and revealed its secret past

John Pilger describes how sports-obsessed Australia's disappointing showing at the London 2012 Olympics have offered a glimpse of a secret past.... [read more]

In southern Iraq too, Ottoman-era heritage decays

Two cemeteries sprawl in this southern Iraqi town. One is for British and Indian soldiers. The other for Turkish veterans. Both died in World War I... [read more]

Independence In The Pocket Of The US: "Mera Pyara Bharat" ("I Love My India?")

With a population of 1.2bn people, many believe that India is the arena where the future direction of humanity is being played out. However, the future of humanity may not be determined in India, but by events in a much smaller country – Syria, writes Colin Todhunter. ... [read more]

Nothing ‘Accidental’ in Mali – More Misery Awaits

Northern Mali promises to be the graveyard of scores of innocent people if African countries don’t collectively challenge Western influence in the region, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Racism By Any Other Name Smells

Thomas Riggins reveals the results of a poll conducted by ScienceDaily examining attitudes to the new voter identification laws in the US... [read more]

A Word in Your Shell-like

In his latest article, resident philosopher Stephen Gilbert bemoans the lack of confidence in our society.... [read more]

Democracy and Slaughter in Burma: Gold Rush Overrides Human Rights

The widespread killings of Rohingya Muslims in Burma – or Myanmar - have received only passing and dispassionate coverage in most media. What they actually warrant is widespread outrage, says Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Bad Sight of the Week

At the weekend, I sent a letter to The Observer via email. So sure am I that the paper will not run it this coming Sunday that I breathe life into it by reproducing it here below... [read more]

More than just a Game: football as the modern opium of the masses

The spectacle of sport, like the 2012 Euro Cup, is the primary medium through which nations and national identities are imagined, writes Ilia Xypolia.... [read more]

The Mendacity of Hope

Rio 2012: the summits which promise to save the world keep us dangling, not mobilising, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Paternal Vigilance

The LPJ's resident philosopher and arts correspondent muses on David Cameron's parenting skills, VIP security and the conclusions of some of our favourite television series.... [read more]

Longing to Reign Over Us

As is my wont, I found plenty to occupy me over the extended half-week holiday and never felt sufficiently at a loose end to find myself tuning in to any of the blowsy and noisy shenanigans somebody thought might be welcome to Her Majesty the Queen to mark the 60th anniversary of her accession, writes W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]

Spain’s fishing armada stopped from ‘raping’ Gibraltar’s waters

LPJ’s Iberian correspondent, David Eade, reports on tensions between Spanish fishermen and the Gibraltarian government following the rescindment of a ‘Joint Understanding’ that allowed Spanish vessels to fish in Gibraltar’s waters... [read more]

The Palestinian Nakba: The Resolve of Memory

Writing about the events of Al-Nakba, Ramzy Baroud reports that every region in Palestine that was meant to be taken was captured, its people were expelled or massacred in their homes and villages. Ben Guiron ‘cleansed’ the land, but he failed to cleanse Israel’s past. Memory persists. ... [read more]

Dead-end journey

Colin Todhunter, London Progressive Journal's India correspondent, reports from Chennai on how a funeral procession through a poor neighbourhood is a metaphor for where India is heading with current social and economic policies... [read more]

Trade unions in Cuba and the emergence of a private sector

Recently returned from a study tour of Cuba, Dr Tomasz Pierscionek recounts his meeting with Jesus Montera, an international relations officer of the CTC... [read more]

New smells, old smells

In the 60's I assigned myself the meditation of walking extremely slowly down 14th Street, Greenwich Village’s northern border, to Union Square, allowing my senses to notice acrid smells, loud sounds, crowded store windows – but not letting my mind grab for any of it, says Jean Claude van Itallie.... [read more]

An Olympian Inspiration

With the Olympic Games and Paralympics only months away, Hussein Al-Alak introduces some of the key competitors of the Paralympics... [read more]

The New Mandela

Uri Avnery writes about the determination of the Israeli state to keep Marwan Barghouti, Palestine's Mandela, behind bars... [read more]

UKs French set to oust Sarkosy

In his latest article on the upcoming French Presidential elections, David Eade looks at the crucial role French voters living in Britain will play in determining the winner... [read more]

Noncommittal for kindle or less than kind?

The Kindle - an infinity of reading or a bibliophile's nightmare? Stephen Gilbert shares his thoughts on the matter.... [read more]

The Devil’s Playground

The very concept of work, and its application in society, is controlled by those whose policies have been sent straight from hell. outRageous! explains... [read more]

What's behind Kony 2012?

Eugene Puryear describes some of the hidden motivations to bringing Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord's Resistance Army, to justice... [read more]

The Elephant is Still in the Room

The Republicans have no one to blame but themselves if they appear to be careering to electoral defeat, writes W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]

Back to Basics in Palestine: Redefining Our Relationship to a People’s Struggle

Palestinians are governed by laws without internationally recognizable legal frame of reference, a situation that allows Israel to justify the detention of Gaza patients seeking medical treatment outside their besieged area, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Michel Warshawski: walls and democracy

Legoviews are interviews based on 'Lego Serious Play' methodology, in this EXCLUSIVE interview with Michel Warschawski, Patrizia Bertini uses the world famous Lego bricks – to find her interviewee’s answers to tough questions. By involving a creative manual activity, it is thought to engage different areas of the brain and reveal concepts and ideas which might not emerge otherwise.... [read more]

The Florence Anderson Row

Patrick Cawkwell brings attention to the unfair suspension of a Labour Party Councillor... [read more]

Between Politics and Principles: Hamas’ Perilous Manoeuvres

Despite all of Hamas’ assurances to the contrary, a defining struggle is taking place within the Palestinian Islamic movement, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

A ban on boxing- reasoned thinking or sheer discrimination

In the wake of a brawl between Derek Chisora and David Haye outside of the ring, some are calling for a ban on boxing. RJ Middleton asks whether this is an appropriate reaction to the incident... [read more]

The Light That Cracks The Darkness

The people of Spain are actively resisting the effects of austerity. As Bryan G Taylor explains, no amount of 'Reforma Laboral' will stave off call for a revolutionary change... [read more]

The Politics of the Psyche

BBC 4’s Saturday night primetime slot is cornering the market in excellent European drama but we don’t need Denmark to point out how impotent we feel. However idealistic were its ancient Roman origins, the UK’s version of representative democracy has become as distorted as a burning pillar of wax, says outRageous!... [read more]

A manager's dog

‘I am his Highness’ dog at Kew; Pray, tell me sir, whose dog are you?' ( Alexander Pope, Epigram Engraved on the Collar of a Dog which I gave to his Royal Highness)... [read more]

An outRageous! essay on The Arts, Education and The People.

This rant is aimed at your crassness, Cameron. It goes to the heart of what is art, and why it's so important in preparing people for democracy, says outRageous!... [read more]

The Lady Doth Screech too Much

Rhys Harrison reviews 'Iron Lady', a recent film about the life of Margaret Thatcher ... [read more]

A Ghost Story Retailed (part three)

W Stephen Gilbert delivers an up-to-date, state and fate of the retail trade in Britain, it is partly personal and anecdotal, and partly a critical overview: part three.... [read more]

A Ghost Story Retailed (part two)

W Stephen Gilbert delivers an up-to-date, state and fate of the retail trade in Britain, it is partly warmingly, personal and anecdotal, and partly a critical overview: part two...... [read more]

Light and fluid warriors

In the second of her interviews using the 'Lego Serious Play' method, Patrizia Bertini meets Ollie, a young occupier at the OccupyLSX camp... [read more]

Letter to a Soldier of the IDF

John Wight writes a letter in commemoration of the third anniversary of Operation Cast Lead, Israel's military assault on Gaza, it is written in the form of a letter to an IDF soldier. ... [read more]

Why capitalism likes us to behave irrationally

It’s a great irony that although human beings, as distinct from other animals, are characterised by their ability for rational thinking, so much of our behaviour is irrational, argues John Green.... [read more]

What a £ot of Balls!

outRageous! thinks sports have gone Doo-£ally!... [read more]

Good and Evil

What happened to considerations of good and evil? This is the question that Jean Claude van Itallie ponders.... [read more]

'Zero-Problems' Foreign Policy No More: Turkey and the Syrian 'Abyss'

Ramzy Baroud notes the U-turn in Turkey's foreign policy towards its neighbour Syria.... [read more]

The Son of Africa claims a continent’s crown jewels

John Pilger denounces American imperialist strategy in Africa ... [read more]

Empty words from Israel?

Uri Avnery casts a close eye on Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu\'s threat of an attack against Iran... [read more]

Slavery for Dummies- Part three

The third and final part of an analysis by OutRageous! looking at the slavery endemic in our modern society. ... [read more]

The More Enemies, The More Honor

Uri Avnery reflects upon Israel\'s faltering relations with its allies.... [read more]

What might make Christopher Hitchens change his mind about 1492?

On the anniversary of ‘Columbus day’ David Hill questions journalist Christopher Hitchens\' admiration of the year 1492... [read more]

Interview: Behind the Lines

Hussein Al-Alak speaks with a Jordanian based activist involved in helping Iraqi refugees who have fled to Jordan.... [read more]

'Justice' American style

Jean Claude van Itallie tells how the state of Georgia callously executed an innocent man, Troy Davis.... [read more]

The Return of the Generals

Uri Avnery discusses how a recent resurgence of hostilities between Islamic militants and the Israeli army could undermine a growing social protest movement within Israel, playing right into Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s hands.... [read more]

The New Anti-Semitism

Uri Avnery, Israeli writer and founder of the Gush Shalom peace movement, offers a warning from history as he examines a modern form of racism taking root across Europe.... [read more]

Even the most powerful man in the world is not above a pie in the face

When media magnate Rupert Murdoch was summoned before the Commons select committee on 19th July, one man tried to ensure he would not walk away untarnished. Jonathan May Bowles, famed as the individual who threw a shaving foam pie at Murdoch, explains his actions.... [read more]

Al Arabiya’s piracy and journalism’s codes of ethics

Iqbal Tamimi on the rights of journalists and photographers and the attempts by major news organisations to ride roughshod over them.... [read more]

Tunisia: How We Got Here and the Task Ahead

Ramzy Baroud reflects on the causes of the popular uprising and where we go from here.... [read more]

Introducing ... British Government Plc

John Green on the growing preponderance of unelected advisors from the business sector in senior government roles. ... [read more]

Obama's Next War Project

For all its rhetoric on Iraq, history suggests the Obama administration is likely to embark on a new war, says Rhoderick Gates.... [read more]

Mervyn King Comes to Town

Rob Sewell considers the significance of Mervyn King's address to the TUC in Manchester.... [read more]

A Clash of Fundamentalisms

In the third article in his series, 'Contextualising the Threat of Islam', Richard Greeman compares Islamic Fundamentalism with the U.S. regime's own brand on fundamentalist politics.... [read more]

Defending the NHS Against Privatisation: John Lister talks to London Progressive Journal (Part Two)

The second part of Tomasz Pierscionek's discussion with prominent anti-privatisation campaigner John Lister.... [read more]

Beyond Violence and Non-Violence: Resistance as a Culture

Political resistance is not simply gratuitous violence - is a collective response to oppression, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

World Cup Fever Starts To Cool

The football World Cup is one giant consumerist showcase, argues Steve Jones.... [read more]

‘The Internet is a Game Changer’

With news coverage gradually moving towards a 'paperless world' in the internet age, Ramzy Baroud considers the implications for political journalism.... [read more]

Dispatch from China: Number 15 Has Left the Building

The fight against climate change presents a peculiar set of challenges for media oulets balancing corporate business models with the urgent need for critical debate, as Ramzy Baroud explains.... [read more]

Netanyahu’s Ring and the Legitimacy of Zionism

At the root of Israeli state violence is a total refusal to recognise the Palestinians as a people, let alone a nation, writes Ahmed Amr.... [read more]

The Israeli Occupation: The Bubble Has to Burst

Reporting from Al Najah, Assed Baig looks at how Palestinians are coping with the increase in Israeli settlement building.... [read more]

The Greeks are Fighting for Us All

The Greek crisis is merely the first stage of a wider global backlash against neoliberal economics, argues Steven Colatrella.... [read more]

Western Media, Not Israeli Hasbara

Despite the best efforts of the mainstream media to play down the barbaric assault on Gaza, Israel cannot win the public relations war, argues Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Why Support the Palestinians?

Of the many international solidarity movements in the world today, the Palestinian struggle has a special status. Greg Sharzer explains why.... [read more]

Requiem for a Crowded Planet

George Monbiot's analysis of the failure of the climate talks.... [read more]

Justice for Western Sahara

Joanna Allan on the high-profile campaign to draw international attention to the plight of the people of the Western Sahara at the hands of the brutal Moroccan occupation.... [read more]

“…And A Little Child Shall Lead Them”

Barack Obama has weakly capitulated to Binyamin Netanyahu over Israeli settlement-building in the heart of the Arab community in East Jerusalem, says Uri Avnery.... [read more]

The Socialist Case Against The Cuts

Britain's three biggest parties are committed to massive spending cuts. Socialist Appeal's Mick Brooks challenges the mainstream consensus.... [read more]

Wobbly Stools

Uri Avnery considers the respective struggles facing three embattled leaders - Obama, Netanyahu and Abbas.... [read more]

US Audacity of Hope Falters: Settlement Freeze No Longer Required

The Obama administration's policy on Israel-Palestine is looking increasingly indistinguishable from that of the Bush years, as Ramzy Baroud explains.... [read more]

Who Killed Yasser Arafat and Why?

Ramzy Baroud considers the implications of the conspiracy theories surrounding Yasser Arafat's death five years ago.... [read more]

Ahmadinejad Re-elected: Israel and Obama’s Iran Puzzle

The crisis in Iran presents a singular challenge to Barack Obama's foreign policy credentials, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Book of the Month: Stephen Chan, 'The End of Certainty'

Matt Genner reviews this month's recommendation.... [read more]

Venezuela and Argentina Increase Cooperation in Gas, Agriculture, and Finance

James Suggett on the latest Venezuelan-led initiative to further economic cooperation between Latin American states.... [read more]

Clinton's Unpromising Start

Ramzy Baroud on the inauspicious opening phase of the new Obama administration's Middle East policy.... [read more]

Israel Investigated, But Will It Repent?

Ramzy Baroud issues a call for justice for the victims of Israeli violence.... [read more]

Gutter Press Campaign Aims to Distort Union Demands

Rob Sewell on the mainstream press's campaign to discredit the unions in the wake of recent strike action.... [read more]

Palestinian Boxing: Raging Bulls

Despite cramped conditions and limited resources, the Baqa'a boxing club has provided a valuable facility for the young men of one Palestinian refugee camp, as Hussein Al-Alak explains.... [read more]

Report from a Refugee Camp in Kashmir

As India and Pakistan engage in sabre rattling troops have been moving towards their forward deployments, Assed Baig asks: What about the victims of this age-old rivalry?... [read more]

Interview: Rob Miller of the Cuba Solidarity Campaign

Rob Miller answers Tomasz Pierscionek's questions about the Cuba Solidarity Campaign.... [read more]

Ecuador Pushing to Break Free from the Cycle of Debt

Samuele Mazzolini examines a bold new intiative from the Ecuadorean government, aimed at establishing a coordinated transnational policy among debtor nations with respect to the crippling debt burdens that are stifling progress in the developing world.... [read more]

A Third Palestinian Intifada in the Making

Prominent journalist and author Ramzy Baroud considers the many uncertainties ahead for the Palestinian struggle. ... [read more]

Congressional Candidate and Anti-war Campaigner Michael Prysner Takes on Workers' Issues

Ahead of next week's big vote in the United States, Jon Peter Daly reviews the valiant efforts of a minority party - the Party for Socialism and Liberation - to mount a progressive challenge to the mainstream parties.... [read more]

A League of Their Own

Hussein Al-Alak reviews the achievements of Palestinian sportsmen across the Arab world.... [read more]

Gordon Brown and "Light Touch" Regulation

Mick Brooks on how Gordon’s policies left the UK unprepared for the present financial crisis.... [read more]

Remembering Professor Kulthum Odeh (1892 -1965)

Reviewing the life of Kulthum Odeh, the first woman in the Arab world to hold a professorship, Iqbal Tamimi considers the all-pervading ignorance about Palestine.... [read more]

Colombia’s Double Realities: Threats Against Indigenous Communities Ignored as Calls for a Second Re-election of President Uribe Get Louder

As Colombia's President Uribe continues to target the country's indigenous communities, Mario A. Murillo examines why many Colombians are opposed to Uribe's reactionary government.... [read more]

Windfall tax: Good for the Country, Good for Labour

Zoe Gannon believes a progressive policy on taxation would help restore working-class support for Labour and revive the party's electoral prospects.... [read more]

Losing the Will to Serve

With below-inflation pay rises and increased targets, no wonder Labour has lost the votes of the public sector workers who keep this country going.... [read more]

Ecuador's President Correa in Conflict with Indigenous Movement

Samuele Mazzolin on why the Ecuaodorean president's agenda for modernisation and wealth redistribution has brought him into an unlikely conflict with the country's indigenous groups.... [read more]

Election Analysis from the Left List

Left-wing coalition group Left List offer their verdict on the local elections.... [read more]

The Great Consolidation

George Monbiot on New Labour's ongoing attack on the NHS.... [read more]

"Unfashionable" Balkan Nationalism?

Victor Petroff on the rise of right-wing populism in Bulgaria.... [read more]