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Khaled Taja: The Anthony Quinn of Arab Drama

Khaled Taja, 70 years old and the iconic figure of Arabic drama, is planning to play the leading role in a movie about the tunnels of Gaza, writes Iqbal Tamimi.... [read more]

The left wing case for quitting the EU

Much of the left would agree that the European Union does not always function in the best interests of either the European or International working class... [read more]

Introducing ... British Government Plc

John Green on the growing preponderance of unelected advisors from the business sector in senior government roles. ... [read more]

Volunteer Roles at CAAT

Campaign Against the Arms Trade are looking to fill two volunteer roles.... [read more]

The Internet: A Democratising Force or Information Overload?

Matt Genner examines the impact of the dot com revolution on democratic debate and political activism.... [read more]

Capitalism Made You A Whore

This somewhat ranty piece won't win me any friends among the so-called sisterhood... [read more]

Malcolm Fraser, RIP

John Malcolm Fraser, prime minister of Australia from 1975 to 1983, passed away on 20 March 2015... [read more]

Paternal Vigilance

The LPJ's resident philosopher and arts correspondent muses on David Cameron's parenting skills, VIP security and the conclusions of some of our favourite television series.... [read more]

A manager's dog

‘I am his Highness’ dog at Kew; Pray, tell me sir, whose dog are you?' ( Alexander Pope, Epigram Engraved on the Collar of a Dog which I gave to his Royal Highness)... [read more]

Women Leaders key to post-conflict development on Bougainville

Following a recent trip to the island, coinciding with the tenth anniversary of the end of the Bougainville Civil War, Catherine Wilson reports on the role women played in bringing peace to the island.... [read more]

The Gay Liberation Front's Social Revolution

Forty years ago, the Gay Liberation Front challenged society's gender system. Peter Tatchell looks back on four decades of activism.... [read more]

The Bigger Picture

Here in the UK, the British Academy of Film and Television has just presented the Bafta awards, and yes, as an elected lifetime member I’m one of the several thousand who vote for the nominees.... [read more]

Iraq: Will Tony Blair Finally Stand Trial for His Part in the “Supreme International Crime”?

Perhaps, at last, justice may have a chance, one which might set a precedent and also deter any politician or leader from embarking on the “supreme international crime”, ever again. Here’s fervently hoping.... [read more]

Danegeld

It was just over a thousand years ago that the King of England shook his piggy bank and found it full of twigs and trinkets. He needed dosh and he needed it fast.... [read more]

Trading Places

More than ever in human history, we're caught in a tug of war that threatens to destabilise entire populations and even to redefine geo-political and cultural boundaries.... [read more]

America Polarized in Turmoil

United, we must take back our country from the ultra-supremacists in the White House... [read more]

In the meantime things are getting meaner

In the meantime there is a crisis of democracy. It is not a crisis in one country. The peace dividends we were promised have been squandered.... [read more]

Quo Vadis, Venezuela?

Even if highly exaggerated in the western press, the economic and political crisis in Venezuela is real... [read more]

Hasta siempre Comandante

While some of the mainstream media are unsuccessfully seeking to tarnish Castro’s image, thousands upon thousands of messages are pouring into Cuba from literally all over the world to pay homage to him... [read more]

Brexit has its day in court!

The third day of November 2016 was an historic day for parliamentary democracy. It was a day on which an investment fund manager and a hairdresser took on the might of the UK government in the High Court and won... [read more]

The Great Rift

The tragedy of present-day Israel is not that there are so many divisions, but that they all converge in one large rift.... [read more]

The Center Doesn't Hold

"The best lack all convictions, while the worst are full of passionate intensity!"... [read more]

The Subversive Vision of Patricia Highsmith

The release of the film ‘Carol’, based on Patricia Highsmith’s 1952 novel, ‘The Price of Salt’, gives us an opportunity to enter into the subversive world of one of the 20th century’s greatest popular writers... [read more]

What’s wrong with Britain?

One glance on Sunday morning at The Guardian website demonstrated quite clearly what is wrong with Britain – and, probably, the rest of the ‘developed’ world... [read more]

UN Farce: Saudi Arabia to Head Human Rights Council

The UN has appointed Saudi Arabia’s envoy to the United Nations Human Rights Council to head (or should that be “behead”) an influential human rights panel... [read more]

Iraq Inquiry – Five Year, £10 Million Whitewash of Blair Regime?

Bereaved UK families who lost sons and daughters in the illegal invasion of Iraq have now threatened legal action against Sir John Chilcot... [read more]

Life, Oil and Ghosts in the delta of the river Niger

Sweet and light - crude oil from the delta of the river Niger is the major Nigerian commodity and European and American companies export it for a profit... [read more]

Tony Blair’s Save the Children Award: An Inadequate Apology

On the evening of 19th November 2014, the charity Save the Children "recognized" Tony Blair - whose government enjoined in the ending of the fledgling lives of children on an industrial scale in Afghanistan and Iraq - with their “Global Legacy Award.”... [read more]

Iraq’s Children: Ever Expendable - From Madeleine Albright to “Save the Children.”

By 2010, seven years in to an unending war, over a quarter of Iraqi children suffered from Post Traumatic Stress disorder... [read more]

Where trade agreements are a risk to sovereignty

A nation's sovereign right to determine matters within its borders is put at risk where its government signs a trade agreement which includes a dispute resolution clause known as an Investor State Dispute Settlement ('ISDS') clause... [read more]

Tony Blair, Infanticide Endorser Rewarded by Save The Children

When the Orwellianly name “Middle East Peace Envoy” Tony Blair was named “Philanthropist of the Year” by GQ Magazine in September for “his tireless charitable work” there was widespread disbelief... [read more]

How the media shafted the people of Scotland

Journalists in their gilded circles are woefully out of touch with popular sentiment and shamefully slur any desire for change, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Machismo underpins war and tyranny

A macho mindset is a psychological precondition for all oppression... [read more]

Sick of this market-driven world? You should be

The self-serving con of neoliberalism is that it has eroded the human values the market was supposed to emancipate, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

The People's Assembly- Building an Alternative

The People’s Assembly has the potential to become the successor to the popular fronts of the 1930s in uniting the broad left writes Dr Thabo Miller... [read more]

Waiting for Mangabe or Slavoj Zizek on Mandela's Socialist Failure

This is a reply to Slavoj Zizek's article "Mandela's Socialist Failure" published online in The Stone (a New York Times maintained philosophy blog) on December 6, 2013... [read more]

Banks versus the People: The Underside of a Rigged Game! (Part 2)

The European Central Bank and the Federal Reserve are at the service of the major private banks... [read more]

Resurrecting woolly mammoths is exciting – but it's a fantasy

De-extinction sounds like a great idea. But there’s a problem most people have overlooked, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Marxism, the Taliban and Plato

Recently Simon Blackburn, the well known British philosopher, reviewed "Knowing Right from Wrong," the new book by Kieran Setiya, in the TLS... [read more]

The Italian crisis and the wait for Godot

A crisis is a crucial point, a turning point, a situation that demands change or reaction in order to resolve the situation... [read more]

Oxford University won't take funding from tobacco companies. But Shell's OK

If scholars don't take an ethical stance against corporate money, where's the moral check on power? George Monbiot reports.... [read more]

Venezuelan elections

John Green provides an analysis of and background to today's election in Venezuela... [read more]

You are now leaving Working England, Welcome to Middle England: The socio-economic underachievement of Neo-Liberalism in attaining reduced class disparity

Since the economic reform of the 1980’s, politicians like Blair, Thatcher and Prescott absolutely believe that the working class no longer exists and the majority of UK citizens are now middle class, writes Elijah Pryor.... [read more]

Australia's Julia Gillard is no feminist hero

The Guardian's description of Australia's opposition leader Tony Abbott as "neanderthal" is not unreasonable. Misogyny is an Australian blight and a craven reality in political life. But for so many commentators around the world to describe Julia Gillard's attack on Abbott as a "turning point for Australian women" is absurd, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Has ‘Citizen Khan’ on BBC One bridged the gap? .

‘Citizen Khan’ might have taken the mickey of some Muslims, but not of Islam, and that is a huge difference. I would not say that the show has stereotyped Asians as claimed, but rather seemed to be a reflection of self-criticism, writes Iqbal Tamini.... [read more]

Mass media directing the masses

Luke Innes looks at the effect of mass media on the working class in Britain... [read more]

Turkey, the Kurdish Struggle and the New Middle East

Turkey, a NATO member, has historically been a key strategic ally of the West in the Cold War but the political situation inside the country is far from tolerant of opposition, writes David Morgan. ... [read more]

Change is the Only Constant: Got Any Spare?

outRageous! is back asking the questions no one else dares... [read more]

Camping Needs Solid Ground

LPJ's arts correspondent and resident philosopher, Stephen Gilbert, comments that an emphasis on celebrity is the prevailing television flavour of the age, infecting every genre of programming, whether appropriate or not... [read more]

The Acceptable Face of Violence

The recent claims about India’s poverty having fallen by around seven per cent provided a stark reminder of the violent times we live in, writes Colin Todhunter.... [read more]

Hollywood is a place where they'll pay you a thousand dollars for a kiss and fifty cents for your soul

In an exclusive for the London Progressive Journal, writer and former actor John Wight reflects on his years in Hollywood and shines a spotlight on the ‘glamour’ of life in the movie industry... [read more]

Memory in Exile: An Interview with Jorge Coulon of Inti Illimani

Ramona Wadi speaks with a member of the famous Chilean band Inti Illimani, a group that was part of the nueva cancion movement in the 60s and 70s... [read more]

NONE SO BLIND - An outRageous! challenge

outRageous! lays down the gauntlet to all readers of the London Progressive Journal... [read more]

The head cover

The three women Nobel Peace Prize winners of 2011, wore head Covers. Does that mean that the ‘West’ is acknowledging freedom of identity of people from the third world? asks Iqbal Tamimi.... [read more]

The Lady Doth Screech too Much

Rhys Harrison reviews 'Iron Lady', a recent film about the life of Margaret Thatcher ... [read more]

Interview: Behind the Lines

Hussein Al-Alak speaks with a Jordanian based activist involved in helping Iraqi refugees who have fled to Jordan.... [read more]

Blog: Lies Lies Lies

outRageous! - Lies about the recent gunplay in Kabul and the stuff no one wants you to know.... [read more]

The New Anti-Semitism

Uri Avnery, Israeli writer and founder of the Gush Shalom peace movement, offers a warning from history as he examines a modern form of racism taking root across Europe.... [read more]

Defending the NHS Against Privatisation: John Lister talks to London Progressive Journal (Part One)

Tomasz Pierscionek talked to veteran health campaigner and London Health Emergency information director Dr John Lister.... [read more]

‘The Internet is a Game Changer’

With news coverage gradually moving towards a 'paperless world' in the internet age, Ramzy Baroud considers the implications for political journalism.... [read more]

Heroes of the 21st Century

The first decade of the 21st Century has been marred by violence, militarism and oppression in the Global South. But there has also been resistance. Tomasz Pierscionek profiles some of the radical heroes of the past ten years.... [read more]

The US and Colombian Roles in the Honduran Crisis

Garry Leech argues that the US role in the Honduran crisis represents a continuation of the traditional US approach towards democracy in Central America.... [read more]

US Audacity of Hope Falters: Settlement Freeze No Longer Required

The Obama administration's policy on Israel-Palestine is looking increasingly indistinguishable from that of the Bush years, as Ramzy Baroud explains.... [read more]

Should We Seek to Save Industrial Civilisation? A Debate with Paul Kingsnorth

Guardian journalist George Monbiot discusses climate change with the Oxford-based environmentalist Paul Kingsnorth.... [read more]

Stonewall 40 - Our Lost Gay Radicalism

Peter Tatchell believes London's gay community has lost much of its radical edge.... [read more]

Venezuela and Argentina Increase Cooperation in Gas, Agriculture, and Finance

James Suggett on the latest Venezuelan-led initiative to further economic cooperation between Latin American states.... [read more]

Interview: Ilan Pappe talks to London Progressive Journal

Tomasz Pierscionek spoke with prominent Israeli academic and activist Ilan Pappe.... [read more]

A Third Palestinian Intifada in the Making

Prominent journalist and author Ramzy Baroud considers the many uncertainties ahead for the Palestinian struggle. ... [read more]

Remembering Professor Kulthum Odeh (1892 -1965)

Reviewing the life of Kulthum Odeh, the first woman in the Arab world to hold a professorship, Iqbal Tamimi considers the all-pervading ignorance about Palestine.... [read more]

Mail Order Cuts

Rob Ray on the closures ordered across the UK's postal service. ... [read more]

Who Cares for the Carers?

How privatisation is costing social care workers. ... [read more]