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The Runaway Dog

One of the paradoxes of our species is the total control we have over almost every aspect of our babyhood during the first year or so of life... [read more]

Anti-What?

Uri Avnery asks if anti-semitism is on the rise in Europe... [read more]

My Glorious Brothers

When I was 15 years old and a member of the Irgun underground (by today's criteria, an honest-to-goodness terrorist organization), we sang "(In the past) we had the heroes / Bar Kochba and the Maccabees / Now we have the new ones / The national youth…"... [read more]

Crusaders and Zionists

Caesarea was built by King Herod some 2000 years ago and named after his Roman master, Augustus Caesar. It once again became an important town under the Crusaders, who fortified it.... [read more]

Syria: The Murder of Dr Khaled al-Assad, The Guardian of Palmyra

When a new Syria one day confronts the impossible task of rebuilding itself, one elderly academic’s quiet resistance will provide a stark example of dauntlessness and civilization amidst the rubble of its bleakest hour... [read more]

The USSR – the Democracy You Didn’t Know About

Kate Zagoskina explains the origins of democracy and it various manifestations throughout history... [read more]

In Defence of Lenin

Following the 90th anniversary of Lenin's death, Rob Sewell reviews his legacy... [read more]

An Eruption of Reality

George Monbiot asks: has our society become too complex to sustain?... [read more]

Palestine's Nelson Mandela

Divide et impera – "divide and rule" – since Roman times this has been a guiding principle of every regime that suppresses another people. In this the Israeli authorities have been incredibly successful.... [read more]

What Happened to the Jews?

A new generation of Jews in America is turning their backs on Israel altogether... [read more]

Imagined Nations

Each of us has a few books that formed and changed his or her world view... [read more]

“Conflict Issues” In Israel and Palestine: Debate in Committee Room G, British Houses of Parliament

Sitting in Committee Room G in the Houses of Parliament on 23rd October was a sobering affair... [read more]

Divide et Impera

Binyamin Netanyahu is not known as a classical scholar, but even so he has adopted the Roman maxim Divide et Impera, divide and rule.... [read more]

To pay or not to pay?

Joseph Stiglitz shows that a suspension of debt repayments can be beneficial for a country and its people... [read more]

Not Michael Gove's Misbegotten Shambles

Michael Gove is a neoconservative member of Denis MacShane’s Henry Jackson Society, and thus also an admirer of Tony Blair and of George W Bush, neither of whom would have got any of the jokes in Blackadder... [read more]

International Relations and the Classroom

We in Britain are often subject to the age old criticism of being insular and self engrossed. Whereas this is not strictly speaking true, there is an element of truth in this belief... [read more]

Socialism and Christianity

David Benbow compares the tenets of Christianity with Socialist theory... [read more]

The Politics of the Psyche

BBC 4’s Saturday night primetime slot is cornering the market in excellent European drama but we don’t need Denmark to point out how impotent we feel. However idealistic were its ancient Roman origins, the UK’s version of representative democracy has become as distorted as a burning pillar of wax, says outRageous!... [read more]

United in our Heritage

In response to comments made by David Cameron, Hussein Al-Alak takes a look at the origins of ‘Britishness’... [read more]

Who's the Boss?

After a tumultuous few weeks in Israeli politics, Uri Avnery examines the worrying rhetoric emanating from the new administration.... [read more]

Universal Spiritual Humanism or Divine Faith Religiocism

From as far back as the early Stone Age three million years ago, our ancestral hominids must have developed a cognition to discern whether or not a certain invisible being was responsible for punitive afflictions... [read more]

The Key to a Sustainable Economy Is 5,000 Years Old

We are again reaching the point in the business cycle known as “peak debt,” when debts have compounded to the point that their cumulative total cannot be paid... [read more]

Facebook May Pose a Greater Danger Than Wall Street

Payments can happen cheaply and easily without banks or credit card companies, as has already been demonstrated—not in the United States but in China.... [read more]

High & Mighty

A few decades ago, a visit to my cousin in upstate New York included a trip to a shopping mall. ... [read more]

Transaction Analysis

Baffled? Confused? Me too!... you, too?... [read more]

Separation is Beautiful

It says the Likud is the most cunning instrument for keeping the Mizrahim down. That the endless rule of Binyamin Netanyahu, the very personification of the Ashkenazi elite... [read more]

The Bizarre Case of Bashar

When I first heard that, on April 4, Bashar al-Assad had bombed Khan Sheikhoun with nerve gas my inner voice whispered: wait. Something wrong. Something smells fishy. First of all, it was too quick. Just a few hours after the event, everybody knew it was Bashar who did it.... [read more]

The New Wave

When I was young, there was a joke: "There is no one like you – and that's a good thing!"... [read more]

Iran as the Historical Tri-Continental Bridge, and Ireland? An Ethno-Cultural and Etymological Interconnectedness

Over forty years ago, a number of Irish professors visiting the University of Tehran disseminated their research findings that there is a firm anthropological connection between Iran and Ireland from the distant past... [read more]

In the meantime things are getting meaner

In the meantime there is a crisis of democracy. It is not a crisis in one country. The peace dividends we were promised have been squandered.... [read more]

An Old Palestinian Heart still Beats on

A poem by Dr Faysal Mikdadi... [read more]

Oh My God, Trump!

We do not really know who Trump is, and what he will do during the next four years. We know only the Trump of the elections: a nasty person, a megalomaniac, a liar, an ignoramus.... [read more]

The Lesser Evil

Who will win the elections in the US in three days?... [read more]

Yalda: the winter solstice

Winter solstice has been celebrated by many human communities throughout the millennia... [read more]

The Settlers' Prussia

Israeli democracy is sliding downwards. Sliding slowly, comfortably, but unmistakably... [read more]

Leader without Glory

Abu Mazen was very different from Arafat. Arafat was flamboyant, spontaneous, extrovert. Abu Mazen is rather withdrawn, introverted, cautious, meticulous... [read more]

The Ministry of Fear

"We have nothing to fear but fear itself," said President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. He was wrong... [read more]

A Revolutionary Pope Calls for Rethinking the Outdated Criteria That Rule the World

Pope Francis’ revolutionary encyclical addresses not just climate change but the banking crisis... [read more]

Reflections on China’s South Sea Trouble Thomas Riggins

Lying in the South China Sea between Indochina and the Philippines is a collection of 700 or so small islands collectively known as the Spratly Islands... [read more]

Iraq: The Destruction of Nineveh’s History – Murdering Mesopotamia

March 19th commemorates the twelfth anniversary of the beginning of the destruction of Iraq... [read more]

The Casino Republic

Money plays an ever-increasing role in politics. Election propaganda is made on television, which is very expensive... [read more]

Some deny society exists. Let’s prove them wrong

There’s more to life than consumerism. But to find it we need new models of supporting each other, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Waving in the first Row

Netanyahu went to Paris as part of his election campaign... [read more]

The Origin of Islamic fundamentalism and possibilities for its eradication

The global resurgence of violent Islamic fundamentalism can only be circumvented with a full comprehension and acknowledgment of what has historically gone wrong... [read more]

Niall Ferguson on Kissinger's 'World Order' [Part Two]

"Vice is a monster of so frightful mien, As, to be hated, needs but to be seen; Yet, seen too oft, familiar with her face, We first endure, then pity, then embrace." (Alexander Pope, Essay on Man)... [read more]

Gaza: Middle East “Peace Envoy” Tony Blair Parties as Gaza Burns

The Fourth Geneva Convention is specific in prohibiting attacks on civilian hospitals, medical transport and of course designates collective punishment a war crime... [read more]

Bread and Circuses in a Digital Age

Bread and circuses have always been a central aspect of ruling class hegemony and a means of keeping the masses in a soporific state... [read more]

Lenin's State and Revolution: Chapter One Parts 2&3

Still basing himself on Engels' work, Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State, Lenin points out that the State is the first form of society exclusively to base itself on a given territory... [read more]

The Imperator

In the middle of the 70s, Ariel Sharon asked me to arrange something for him - a meeting with Yasser Arafat... [read more]

The Key Relevance of the Writings of Professor Kenneth Kenkichi Kurihara

George Tait Edwards explains how the writings of economist Kenneth Kurihara serve as the gateway to understanding Shimomuran high-growth economics ... [read more]

Bringing Anne Frank's Vision to the Modern World

It was once stated, that “those who ignore history are doomed to repeat its mistakes”. Over the past few weeks, in the northern city of Manchester, UK, the question of learning has been at the very centre of the Anne Frank + You exhibition, writes Hussein Al-alak... [read more]

Camping Needs Solid Ground

LPJ's arts correspondent and resident philosopher, Stephen Gilbert, comments that an emphasis on celebrity is the prevailing television flavour of the age, infecting every genre of programming, whether appropriate or not... [read more]

DEREK, or LITTLE by LITTLE

By common consent (at least among those like me who lived through it), the ‘golden age’ of broadcasting – at the BBC especially – was that which spanned the 1960s, writes W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]

Book review- The Strongman: Vladimir Putin and the Struggle for Russia

David Lane reviews ‘The Strongman: Vladimir Putin and the Struggle for Russia’ by Angus Roxburgh... [read more]

The New Mandela

Uri Avnery writes about the determination of the Israeli state to keep Marwan Barghouti, Palestine's Mandela, behind bars... [read more]

An outRageous! essay on The Arts, Education and The People.

This rant is aimed at your crassness, Cameron. It goes to the heart of what is art, and why it's so important in preparing people for democracy, says outRageous!... [read more]

What a £ot of Balls!

outRageous! thinks sports have gone Doo-£ally!... [read more]

The tilted scales of justice

Dr Tomasz Pierscionek looks at how the state reacts when it feels its authority being usurped.... [read more]

Another Baghdad Massacre: Iraqi Christians Are Already at Home

Media rhetoric over the struggles of Iraqi Christians represents classic 'divide and rule' imperialism, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

World Cup Fever Starts To Cool

The football World Cup is one giant consumerist showcase, argues Steve Jones.... [read more]

The Biggest Lie in the World and a Few Truths

Steven Colatrella picks apart the myth that free market capitalism is the most rational way of allocating resources.... [read more]

Wobbly Stools

Uri Avnery considers the respective struggles facing three embattled leaders - Obama, Netanyahu and Abbas.... [read more]

Whose Acre?

Uri Avnery on how the battle over the identity of the historic port of Acre reflects wider struggles over cultural identity in Israel-Palestine.... [read more]

Book Review: John Docker, 'The Origins of Violence'

Tom Bangay reviews John Docker's expansive literary genealogy of genocidal violence.... [read more]

The Great Gamble

Uri Avnery assesses a critical moment in Israeli domestic politics.... [read more]

A League of Their Own

Hussein Al-Alak reviews the achievements of Palestinian sportsmen across the Arab world.... [read more]

Gordon Brown and "Light Touch" Regulation

Mick Brooks on how Gordon’s policies left the UK unprepared for the present financial crisis.... [read more]

Remembering Professor Kulthum Odeh (1892 -1965)

Reviewing the life of Kulthum Odeh, the first woman in the Arab world to hold a professorship, Iqbal Tamimi considers the all-pervading ignorance about Palestine.... [read more]

Another Defeat for the Italian Left

Samuele Mazzolini on what the Italian Left can learn from its recent election defeat.... [read more]