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Banks Are Becoming Obsolete in China—Could the U.S. Be Next?

The U.S. credit card system siphons off excessive amounts of money from merchants. In a typical $100 credit card purchase, only $97.25 goes to the seller. The rest goes to banks and processors. But who can compete with Visa and MasterCard?... [read more]

The Cluster Bomb Treaty and the World’s Unfinished Business

Ramzy Baroud examines the curious logic behind the United States' refusal to sign a treaty banning cluster bombs - and finds it wanting.... [read more]

Cypherpunks – freedom and the future of the internet

John Green reviews Cypherpunks – freedom and the future of the internet – a book By Julian Assange with Jacob Appelbaum, Andy Müller-Maguhn and Jérémie Zimmermann... [read more]

Not just a pretty Face(Book)

Google has a rival. Mirage discusses the rise of the social media application Facebook as it lays down the gauntlet... [read more]

Cluster Bombs and Civilian Lives: Efficient Killing, Profits and Human Rights

An Amnesty International report has brought the issue of cluster bombs back into the public limelight, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Chavez Inaugurates Internet Centre to Facilitate Popular Power in Venezuela

Tamara Pearson reports on a Venezuelan government initiative to improve public access to the World Wide Web in Venezuela.... [read more]

Getting out of mass society in order to foster social change

Social change needs good politics. Good politics needs communities. And communities need individuality... [read more]

Trump’s $1 Trillion Infrastructure Plan: Lincoln Had a Bolder Solution

Central banks have been pumping money into the global economy without a whole lot to show for it... [read more]

What is to be Done with the Banks? Radical Proposals for Radical Changes

Immediate measures for moving towards socialisation of the banking sector... [read more]

The Reign of Absurdiocy

There is no such thing as "international terrorism". To declare war on "international terrorism" is nonsense. Politicians who do so are either fools or cynics, and probably both.... [read more]

From Liberal Hand-wringing to the Political Economy of Assassination: The Charleston Shootings and Mainstream Society’s Complicity in Murder (Part 1)

The larger social architecture defined by the academic, political and corporate ties of the gun lobby helps explain how we could systematically take the fight to the NRA... [read more]

Warren’s Post Office Proposal: Palast Aims at the Wrong Target

Investigative reporter Greg Palast is usually pretty good at peering behind the rhetoric and seeing what is really going on. But in tearing into Senator Elizabeth Warren’s support of postal financial services, he has done a serious disservice to the underdogs... [read more]

The Banks, Fragile Giants

Part 5 of Eric Toussaint's series Banks versus the People: the Underside of a Rigged Game shows that big banks continue playing with fire, because they are persuaded that governments will save them whenever necessary... [read more]

The Major Policy of the Current Coalition Government is NOT Fiscal Balance But an Increased Rate of Income Shifting From Wage Earners to the Pockets of the Already Rich

The policy of the Coalition Government is not the much-trumpeted and unachievable aim of a balanced budget but the deliberate lowering of median British living standards and the production of more poverty... [read more]

The Sins Of Our Fathers

David Eade reports on the Daily Mail campaign to vilify the father of the Labour Party leader Ed Miliband... [read more]

Shooting down Helicopters

Money is the lubricant that permits the economic system to work. Goods and wealth that are produced, distributed, circulated, used and owned do so because of money... [read more]

You are now leaving Working England, Welcome to Middle England: The socio-economic underachievement of Neo-Liberalism in attaining reduced class disparity

Since the economic reform of the 1980’s, politicians like Blair, Thatcher and Prescott absolutely believe that the working class no longer exists and the majority of UK citizens are now middle class, writes Elijah Pryor.... [read more]

You are now leaving Working England, Welcome to Middle England: The socio-economic underachievement of Neo-Liberalism in attaining reduced class disparity

Since the economic reform of the 1980’s, politicians like Blair, Thatcher and Prescott absolutely believe that the working class no longer exists and the majority of UK citizens are now middle class, writes Elijah Pryor. SOFT EDIT - ER 17/01/13... [read more]

The internet- Plutocracy's Achilles' Heel?

Ironically Capitialism's well founded fear of unfettered public access to matters of vital importance stems from the advent of the internet, writes Jim Handley... [read more]

Allan Horsfall 1927-2012: In remembrance

Peter Tatchell recalls the contribution of LGBT rights pioneer Allan Horsfall, who died from heart failure on 27 August 2012, aged 84-years-old.... [read more]

Spot the Difference: Public Relations and Journalism

Finn Bowen asks that in light of the possible convergence of Public Relations and Journalism - once completely separate professions - can we ‘trust the truth’ the media portray? ... [read more]

The Great Impostors

Under the guise of saving the natural world, governments are privatising it and rarely will the money to be made by protecting nature match the money to be made by destroying it, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Reclaiming the NHS

This weekend healthcare campaigners will gather for a conference on how to fight the Coalition’s newly passed Health Act. Alex Nunns assesses their options... [read more]

High Quality Healthcare- Competition brings Quality?

Tomasz Pierscionek sheds light on the recent High Quality Healthcare conference organised by pro free market think tank Reform ... [read more]

Professor Nutt Urges New Thinking on Drugs

As the controversial medical expert David Nutt finds himself back on the news agenda, Tom Bangay considers the vexed question of drug law reform.... [read more]

The ‘Last Ever’ Issue

Our site is changing from its current weekly format to a more conventional blog-like design. London Progressive Journal’s webmaster explains what will change and why.... [read more]

Chavez Launches Interactive Blog

The Venezuelan president has launched his own personal website, as Kiraz Janicke reports.... [read more]

The Internet: A Democratising Force or Information Overload?

Matt Genner examines the impact of the dot com revolution on democratic debate and political activism.... [read more]

Losing the Will to Serve

With below-inflation pay rises and increased targets, no wonder Labour has lost the votes of the public sector workers who keep this country going.... [read more]