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Coming to Grips with Zizek

Two new books by Slavoj Zizek have recently been reviewed by John Gray in the The New York Review of Books, here Thomas Riggins reviews Gray's article. ... [read more]

From Ragged Trousered Philanthropists to Label Wearing Ostriches?

Frank Owen, the lead character in Robert Tressell’s novel The Ragged Trousered Philanthropists, expressed his frustration at the dismissive response of his fellow workers to his arguments for a better society... [read more]

Turkey’s Policies at a Crossroads: From Zero-Problems to a Heap of Trouble

It seems that media consensus has been conclusively reached: Turkey has been forced into a Middle Eastern mess not of its own making; the ‘Zero Problems with Neighbours’ notion, once the foreign policy centrepiece of the Justice and Development Party (AKP), is all but a romantic notion of no use in realpolitik, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

More Equal Than Others

Our society thrives on inequality, insofar as it thrives at all... [read more]

Challenges to the rights of sexual minorities in Africa

A Ugandan Catholic priest analyses the reasons for the existence of homophobia in Africa... [read more]

Henry David Thoreau 150th anniversary

The importance of Henry David Thoreau, the man who told us all we must listen to the world and march to a different drummer, is greater now than the day he died 150 years ago in May 1862, says Miles Caston.... [read more]

Straight to the heart

Gay marriage: 'oh dear, oh lor’, how did this become the issue of the hour? The world appears to have divided itself into two camps and I find myself in neither'- journalist and writer W Steven Gilbert shares his thoughts... [read more]

How Independen​t Would An Independen​t Scotland Be?

Britain’s history of war and imperialism, and its current role as junior partner in service to US hegemony, has had a deleterious impact on British society at home, writes John Wight.... [read more]

Slavery for Dummies- Part three

The third and final part of an analysis by OutRageous! looking at the slavery endemic in our modern society. ... [read more]

No Vacancy

Kids today, eh?! They'd prefer to skip school and laugh and sing on bridges in cities across the globe... [read more]

Control Freaks

Open your hand and breathe into the palm. Now close your fist. What have you caught?... [read more]

The Invisible Diasporan (Part 1)

Mallards Cottage was where I wrote my first novel. I called it The Return. I used to dream most of its events – the very plot was born of a dream on Christmas Eve of 1976... [read more]

Getting out of mass society in order to foster social change

Social change needs good politics. Good politics needs communities. And communities need individuality... [read more]

John Whittingdale's Curious Notion of Culture

The Minister of Culture, Media and Sport has chosen a controversial film as his favourite... [read more]

The Fourth of July and the right of revolution

Every schoolchild in the United States is exposed at one point or another to this famous passage from the Declaration of Independence... [read more]

Sin, Socialism and Sacrilege

In some ultra-conservative circles the issue of gay marriage has become the cause célèbre du jour.... [read more]

What GMOs Are Really About: Profits, Power and Geopolitics

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are not essential for feeding the world... [read more]

Menace on the Menu: Development and the Globalization of Servitude‏ (Part 2)

Me-first acquisitiveness is now pervasive throughout the upper strata of society... [read more]

Lenin: State and Revolution: Withering Away the State

Thomas Riggins reviews the first part of Chapter V of Lenin's State and Revolution (1917)... [read more]

Lenin on the "Withering Away'' of the State and Violent Revolution

Lenin discusses these two topics in section four of chapter one of The State and Revolution (1917)... [read more]

Britain's Legacy in Palestine (Part 2 of 2)

Dr Faysal Mikdadi publishes an excellent account of Palestine's history, focusing on how the economic, racist, religious, nationalistic, commercial and orientalist attitudes of Britain shaped the land and its people (Part 2 of 2)... [read more]

The Theory of Knowledge of Dialectical Materialism and of Empirio-Criticism

Thomas Riggins continues to lead us through Chapter 3 of Lenin's book Materialism and Empiro-criticism ... [read more]

Education for the Masses

If education served to empower people, they would be taught how to live off the land, how to clean, how to talk to other people and how to pursue their own interests... [read more]

A Critique of the analysis of Karl Marx within the BBC’s ‘Masters of Money’ Series

David Benbow critiques the BBC's ‘Masters of Money’ episode, aired last year, that focused on the economic theories of Karl Marx... [read more]

The Great Unmentionable

We have offshored the problem of escalating consumption, and our perceptions of it, by considering only territorial emissions, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Human Conflict- is there a solution?

Professor David Rahni of Pace University, New York, asks a controversial question- Are humans genetically programmed for destruction, greed and fear of others?... [read more]

The true 'creatives' - let them eat cake? Or, in India, poor quality rice

The LPJ's India correspondent, Colin Todhunter, describes how India's true wealth creators are increasingly sidelined as temples to global capitalism spring up across the country... [read more]

The state of Alternative comedy

This year Britain’s king of alternative comedy, Billy Connolly, hits 70-years-old. Still alive and kicking. But is the notion of alternative comedy dead asks Miles Caston.... [read more]

Spying an opportunity

Stephen Gilbert argues that surveillance over the whole population involves an erosion of our basic liberties. We give away our rights at our own peril. ... [read more]

Don’t Quota Me

Is there a single reputable argument in favour of positive discrimination? The fact that so many of our institutions are unrepresentative of the make-up of society is of course deplorable, but manipulating recruitment in order to create an artificial balance is no way to put this right, writes W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]

Wearing Your Heart on Your Lapel

W Stephen Gilbert reflects on the politics of poppy wearing, its dissociation in popular society from what it actually represents and its hijacking by politicians. ... [read more]

Bollywood Novacaine and the Dull Pain of Poverty

Colin Todhunter debunks the myth of India as an \'economic miracle\' ... [read more]

Anti-Palestinism Is Hate Speech

Ahmed Amr examines the acceptable bigotry that pervades the mainstream debate on Israel-Palestine.... [read more]

Book of the Month: Slavoj Žižek's 'First As Tragedy, Then As Farce'

This month's recommendation is a thoughtful critique of the complacency of contemporary political culture, reviewed by Nathaniel Mehr.... [read more]

Iran's Nuclear Theatre Meant to Distract Attention

Ramzy Baroud dissects the media storm over Iran's arms programme.... [read more]

Book of the Month: Alex Callinicos, Imperialism and Global Political Economy

Nathaniel Mehr reviews this month's recommendation.... [read more]

Monarchy: Wrong in Principle

Graham Smith, from the British campaign group Republic,on why republicanism matters.... [read more]

In Defence of Socialism

As the capitalist world engages in much earnest soul-searching in response to the current financial crisis, Tomasz Pierscionek challenges the deeply-ingrained hostility towards socialism which pervades much of contemporary political culture.... [read more]

The Treacherous Quadrangle Impasse of Iran-Israel-Saudi-US Diplomacy (Part I)

Both nations of Iran and Israel share a common historical heritage... [read more]

How Russiagate replaced Analysis of the 2016 Election

Blaming an outside power is a good way to prevent self analysis and positive change. It's gone on far too long.... [read more]

The Venezuela Myth Keeping Us From Transforming Our Economy

Modern Monetary Theory (MMT) is getting significant media attention these days, after Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez said in an interview that it should “be a larger part of our conversation” when it comes to funding the “Green New Deal.... [read more]

‘No Love on the Streets’: Knife crime in Britain

There is something fundamentally wrong with a society when children feel they have to carry deadly weapons in order to protect themselves.... [read more]

THEN AND, UNFORTUNATELY, NOW

Our public duty is to demonstrate our lack of faith in the thoughtless and insensitive polity that erodes the social fabric as a matter of deliberate intention. Philistine and self-satisfied domesticity cannot be the aim of a thinking democracy in a creative culture... [read more]

Alcohol: Why do we drink?

Alcohol consumption is one damaging effect among many that flow from this dominant socio-economic system... [read more]

Tribute to Robert Parry - Investigative Journalist and Patriot

Robert (Bob) Parry was born in 1949 and died suddenly from pancreatic cancer in January 2018. An enthusiastic tribute to him and his work was recently held in Berkeley California... [read more]

What's the Big Idea?

A little riddle for your amusement. It has more to do with class capitalism than you might suppose... [read more]

You can’t have human rights in a neoliberal economy: Britain and the Universal Declaration at 70

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted by the General Assembly of the United Nations in 1948... [read more]

Fox in the Hen House: Why Interest Rates Are Rising

The Fed is aggressively raising interest rates, although inflation is contained, private debt is already at 150% of GDP, and rising variable rates could push borrowers into insolvency. So what is driving the Fed’s push to “tighten”?... [read more]

Transaction Analysis

Baffled? Confused? Me too!... you, too?... [read more]

Separation is Beautiful

It says the Likud is the most cunning instrument for keeping the Mizrahim down. That the endless rule of Binyamin Netanyahu, the very personification of the Ashkenazi elite... [read more]

Reportage: Adjusting the Focus

Two book reviews by outRageous!... [read more]

Ten Problems with the Anti-Russia Obsession

Western media and Democratic Party politicians have made a major campaign accusing Russia of “meddling” in the U.S. election. The following are major problems with the “anti-Russia” theme, starting with the lack of clear evidence.... [read more]

WHATEVER HAPPENED TO ‘MY GENERATION’?

And there are those who ask, ‘Whatever happened to the idealism of my generation?’ Anyone who remembers the Sixties/Seventies years finds themselves asking that question... [read more]

America Polarized in Turmoil

United, we must take back our country from the ultra-supremacists in the White House... [read more]

In the meantime things are getting meaner

In the meantime there is a crisis of democracy. It is not a crisis in one country. The peace dividends we were promised have been squandered.... [read more]

Lenin Deserves To Be Rescued From His False Reputation

2017 is going to see many revised versions of the October Revolution. Some prejudices need to be countermanded even before they are uttered. Lenin’s reputation is overshadowed by, and confused with, Stalin’s.... [read more]

Autonomy and progressive policies

How much should individuality be important for progressive forces? And is it possible to reconcile economic utility and individual autonomy?... [read more]

US Immigration policy is again adrift amid the Presidential Election

US leadership and competitiveness has historically been anchored on its immigration policy... [read more]

Health and Humanity: Conclusion

A healthy human, with a foundation of biopsychosocial health, could hope to find their purpose in life... [read more]

“Print the Money”: Trump’s “Reckless” Proposal Echoes Franklin and Lincoln

The right of government to issue its own money was one of the principles for which the American Revolution was fought... [read more]

Squaring the Circle

This week, President Rivlin published a peace plan. That is not a usual act by a president, whose office is mainly ceremonial.... [read more]

The War on Savings: The Panama Papers, Bail-Ins, and the Push to Go Cashless

Exposing tax dodgers is a worthy endeavor, but the “limited hangout” of the Panama Papers may have less noble ends... [read more]

Health and Humanity Part 4: MIC and BPS

The recent and ongoing reaction of the political class here in the UK to the first prominent peace-promoting party leader in recent times is a yardstick for the modern politician’s disregard to anything Eisenhower said... [read more]

Iranian-Americans are once again the Scapegoat; why?

The inspiring quote from Emma Lazarus on the Statue of Liberty encapsulates our nation’s vision... [read more]

Roy Greenslade's despair

Bryan Gould, former Labour shadow cabinet minister, provides a rebuttal to Roy Greenslade’s recent Guardian article... [read more]

Jack Goody: An Appreciation

David Morgan writes an obituary for Jack Goody... [read more]

Nuclear Deal or Not?

The ratification must be solely entrusted to the U.S. and Iran-- and NOT to Israel and Saudi Arabia... [read more]

Labour and benefit cuts‏

Bryan Gould, former Labour shadow cabinet minister, asks how voters are likely to view a party that so manifestly lacks the courage of its convictions... [read more]

Fast-track Hands the Money Monopoly to Private Banks — Permanently

In March 2014, the Bank of England let the cat out of the bag... [read more]

The Labour leadership election

Bryan Gould, former member of the Labour shadow cabinet, describes what is missing from the leadership contest... [read more]

Malcolm Fraser, RIP

John Malcolm Fraser, prime minister of Australia from 1975 to 1983, passed away on 20 March 2015... [read more]

A Slow-Burning Revolution‏

Former MP and member of the Labour shadow cabinet, Bryan Gould, details the beginnings of a paradigm shift in economic thinking... [read more]

State and Revolution (conclusion)

Thomas Riggins concludes his analysis of Lenin's work - State and Revolution... [read more]

Menace on the Menu: Development and the Globalization of Servitude‏ (Part 1)

In his book ‘The World Economy: A Millennial Perspective’, economist Angus Maddison noted that India was the richest country in the world and had controlled a third of global wealth until the 17th century... [read more]

The Pen Trumps the Sword Anytime (Part 1)

The first part of an 'Introduction' to an illustrated book of poetry by Dr Faysal Mikdadi. The collection, Painted into a Corner, appeared in the summer of 2014... [read more]

The G20 Leaders Communique′

Mark Horner critically reviews four major themes of the G20 Leaders Communique... [read more]

Decent Respect

Sweden, like Britain, was always considered a "pro-Israeli" country, loyally voting against "anti-Israel" resolutions in the UN. If such important Western nations are reconsidering their attitudes towards the policy of Israel, what does it mean?... [read more]

The history and modern role of political Islam

After the collapse of the Soviet Union and the capitalist counter-revolution in China, an immense political vacuum opened up in ideology and politics on a world scale. Article by Dr Lal Khan... [read more]

Washington's madness in Ukraine

What is happening right now in Ukraine may not just be another conflict that will rumble on for a few years and then slowly end in a messy compromise... [read more]

Happy Independence Day? India, Monsanto, GMOs and the Bigger Picture

On 15 August, India will mark its 67th anniversary of independence from Britain. It may seem strange to some that a nation would publicly celebrate its independence while at the same time it less publicly cedes it to outsiders... [read more]

Sick of this market-driven world? You should be

The self-serving con of neoliberalism is that it has eroded the human values the market was supposed to emancipate, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership: Sound Science and the GMO Biotech Sector's Version of Science

Coming from the GMO biotech industry, or its political mouthpieces, the term “sound science” rings extremely hollow... [read more]

The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, A Thatcherite Revolution: “Free Trade”, Corporate Plunder and the War on Working People

Prior to the recent national elections in India, there were calls for a Thatcherite revolution to fast-track the country towards privatisation and neo-liberalism... [read more]

Iraq: General Mark Kimmitt’s Easter Day Mistruths and “The Sound of Freedom.”

In 2003, a month into the invasion, Easter Day fell on the same day as this year, 20th April, as Iraqis of all denominations and none, died, were incarcerated, tortured, found with their heads drilled or no heads, thrown on garbage piles... [read more]

Central government

Former MP and member of the Labour shadow cabinet, Bryan Gould, discusses the flaws in Labour's proposal to devolve power to local regions... [read more]

Banks bluff in a completely legal way

Part 8 of Eric Toussaint's series Banks Versus The People: The Underside Of A Rigged Game!... [read more]

What can we do with what Thomas Piketty teaches us about capital in the twenty-first century? (Part 2 of 2)

Part 2 of Eric Toussaint's review of Thomas Piketty book Capital in the Twenty-First Century... [read more]

'Good' and 'Bad' war - and the struggle of memory against forgetting

The regime that Washington created in the South, the “good” Korea, was set up and run largely by those who had collaborated with Japan and America, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

'Good and Bad' war - and the struggle of memory against forgetting

The regime that Washington created in the South, the “good” Korea, was set up and run largely by those who had collaborated with Japan and America, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Lenin's State and Revolution: Chapter One Parts 2&3

Still basing himself on Engels' work, Origin of the Family, Private Property and the State, Lenin points out that the State is the first form of society exclusively to base itself on a given territory... [read more]

Spend Now, Pay Later?

Climate change is happening, all over the world, not just in certain locations... [read more]

Marxism is Real Naturalism: Galen Strawson and Panpsychism

Sartre once remarked that the attempt to construct a philosophy that goes beyond Marxism simply recreates a pre-Marxist view that is no longer relevant to current understanding... [read more]

A journey into the vice-ridden world of banking

The primary objective of the world’s leaders is to avoid another banking and financial crash that could be worse than the one in September 2008... [read more]

The Failure of the Debt System

Eric Toussaint and Daniel Munevar put forward the case for abolishing third world debt... [read more]

The Lake District is a wildlife desert. Blame Wordsworth

I revere Wordsworth the poet, but not his view of farming as a benign force. The Lakes fells don't need world heritage status – just fewer sheep, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Resurrecting woolly mammoths is exciting – but it's a fantasy

De-extinction sounds like a great idea. But there’s a problem most people have overlooked, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

Why Radical Islam is Growing and How to Deal with It

After the 9/11 tragedy there has been a surge in the radical Islamist movement writes Ola Onikoyi... [read more]

Materialism and Empiro-criticism [Part 6- Did Nature Exist Prior to Man?]

Thomas Riggins guides us through the next part of Lenin's Materialism and Empiro-criticism... [read more]

Marx Reloaded

Thomas Riggins reviews Marx Reloaded, a film by Jason Barker... [read more]

A review of Anita's revolution

Linda Rogers reviews a novel by Shirley Langer, friend of Cuba and witness to the early years of the revolution... [read more]

A Telling Silence

They parasitise us from above. But landowners and the Tory party's idle rich are spared the fairest and simplest of taxes, writes George Monbiot.... [read more]

One Nation- Ed's Third Way

David Eade reports on Ed Milliband's speech at the Fabian Society conference today... [read more]

Social Constructionism Applied to Working Class Educational Attainment

Elijah Pryor looks into the origins, definitions and theory of Social Constructionism and explains inequalities faced by working class children in education... [read more]

The political trial of a caring man and the end of justice in America

The political trial and 22-year sentence of Dr Rafil Dhafir, an Iraqi-born doctor and humanitarian, makes a mockery of the notion that all are equal in the eyes of US law, writes John Pilger.... [read more]

Manipulating History: The Different Faces of ‘Popular Resistance’ in Palestine

Apparently, ‘popular resistance’ has suddenly elevated to become a clash of visions or strategies between the Palestinian Authority in Ramallah and its rivals in Gaza, underscoring an existing and deepening rift between various factions and leaderships, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

The Scotland Question answered

David Eade explains how allowing Scotland a referendum on independence may have implications for other secessionist movements across Europe.... [read more]

The Majority of Israelis and Palestinians Want Peace

Susan Walpole discusses how the majority of Jews and Muslims wish to live in peace... [read more]

Nuclear power, the energy of protest: The future could be renewable

With proper commitment and investment in renewable energy and a push towards an alternative model of development, the future need not resemble the past or indeed the increasingly catastrophic present, writes Colin Todhunter. ... [read more]

Growing Isolation: Boycott of Israel Crosses to Governments’ Realm

Should Israel be worried? Very much so, for the age of total impunity is coming to an end. Critical voices of the Israeli occupation and mistreatment of Palestinians are rising - not only within civil society circles, but among world governments as well, argues Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Mass media directing the masses

Luke Innes looks at the effect of mass media on the working class in Britain... [read more]

Spot the Difference: Public Relations and Journalism

Finn Bowen asks that in light of the possible convergence of Public Relations and Journalism - once completely separate professions - can we ‘trust the truth’ the media portray? ... [read more]

Arrigoni’s Murder Trial in Gaza: Answers Not Just a Verdict

Justice for Vittorio Utopia Arrigoni has been paramount, but we also expect the Gaza government to hand down more than a verdict, also answers to those trying to kill Vittorio’s dream – along with our humanity, writes Ramzy Baroud. ... [read more]

Economic Growth or Abnormal Swelling?

LPJ's India correspondent Colin Todhunter reports that India may have had eight or nine per cent economic growth until this year, but this doesn't show a true picture... [read more]

Shadow of London “Orbit” in Bosnia: Steel, Blood, and the Suppression of Memory

As ArcelorMittal, the world’s largest steel company, invests 19.2 million pounds of steel to construct a monument marking London’s Olympic Games, a disturbing story is emerging about the refusal to memorialise a former concentration camp in Bosnia it owns today... [read more]

A Word in Your Shell-like

In his latest article, resident philosopher Stephen Gilbert bemoans the lack of confidence in our society.... [read more]

Isle of Wight Festival – an alternative perspective – June 2012

Miles Caston describes the highlights of this year’s Isle of Wight festival and suggests a ‘greener’ way to enjoy music festivals... [read more]

Passage to Ecuador: Chomsky, Assange, sham justice, sham democracies

The mainstream corporate media has been fooling the public for decades. It fails to shine a light on important decisions that are made behind closed doors by unaccountable corporate players, senior politicians and unelected bureaucrats, writes Colin Todhunter.... [read more]

More than just a Game: football as the modern opium of the masses

The spectacle of sport, like the 2012 Euro Cup, is the primary medium through which nations and national identities are imagined, writes Ilia Xypolia.... [read more]

Camping Needs Solid Ground

LPJ's arts correspondent and resident philosopher, Stephen Gilbert, comments that an emphasis on celebrity is the prevailing television flavour of the age, infecting every genre of programming, whether appropriate or not... [read more]

Destroying the Social Fabric of India: The Indian Premier League: Sex, Lies and Capitalism

Colin Todhunter, London Progressive Journal's India correspondent, reports on the worrying fusion of news and entertainment that is part of modern India... [read more]

Senior Moment

This month, I turn 65. If you know your musicals, my naming Eliza Doolittle Day as the date in question will give you the day that this event takes place. If indeed it is An Event, says W. Stephen Gilbert (photo courtesy of Barbra Flinder).... [read more]

Is the BBC middle class enough?

Are our national media outlets the domain of the middle class, or is the truth even worse...? Felix McHugh discusses... [read more]

Noncommittal for kindle or less than kind?

The Kindle - an infinity of reading or a bibliophile's nightmare? Stephen Gilbert shares his thoughts on the matter.... [read more]

The Elephant is Still in the Room

The Republicans have no one to blame but themselves if they appear to be careering to electoral defeat, writes W Stephen Gilbert.... [read more]

Hollywood is a place where they'll pay you a thousand dollars for a kiss and fifty cents for your soul

In an exclusive for the London Progressive Journal, writer and former actor John Wight reflects on his years in Hollywood and shines a spotlight on the ‘glamour’ of life in the movie industry... [read more]

Memory in Exile: An Interview with Jorge Coulon of Inti Illimani

Ramona Wadi speaks with a member of the famous Chilean band Inti Illimani, a group that was part of the nueva cancion movement in the 60s and 70s... [read more]

The Politics of the Psyche

BBC 4’s Saturday night primetime slot is cornering the market in excellent European drama but we don’t need Denmark to point out how impotent we feel. However idealistic were its ancient Roman origins, the UK’s version of representative democracy has become as distorted as a burning pillar of wax, says outRageous!... [read more]

Divine Injustice

Drone warfare can be used to thwart democratic movements, anywhere, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

The State of Racism in Britain

UK society is dead. Or that is what its detractors would like you to think. Many will point the finger not at our leaders or themselves but towards those who they believe don’t belong here - immigrants and asylum seekers, writes Chris Bath.... [read more]

A Ghost Story Retailed

W Stephen Gilbert delivers an up-to-date, state and fate of the retail trade in Britain, it is partly warmingly, personal and anecdotal, and partly a critical overview: part one... [read more]

On Freedom and Imperialism: Arab Spring and the Intellectual Divide

The so-called ‘Arab Spring’ is creating an intellectual divide that threatens any sensible understanding of the turmoil engulfing several Arab countries, says Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Boom at the top

At a time when the poorest are being hit hardest, W Stephen Gilbert comments on the obsence bonuses enjoyed by those at the top echelons of the financial sector and puts paid to the reasons most commonly used to justify such unfair practice.... [read more]

Bush Didn't Write No Damn Book

The former US president's autobiography is little more than a revisionist hoax, writes Ahmed Amr.... [read more]

Media Ambivalence About 'Red Ed' is a Sign of the Times

Nathaniel Mehr reflects on the media reaction to Ed Miliband's success in the Labour leadership election.... [read more]

Regarding US Muslims: A Misguided Debate

Ramzy Baroud on why there is a blinkered and one-sided view of what causes Islamaphobia in America and how best to tackle it.... [read more]

Defending the NHS Against Privatisation: John Lister talks to London Progressive Journal (Part Two)

The second part of Tomasz Pierscionek's discussion with prominent anti-privatisation campaigner John Lister.... [read more]

The Case for an Impartial Turkish Inquiry

As Israel gets on with its whitewash inquiry into the flotilla attack, Ahmed Amr calls for a genuine and impartial investigation.... [read more]

The Middle East is Changing, and Ankara Knows It

Ramzy Baroud reflects on the Turkish response to Israel's murderous assault on an aid flotilla two weeks ago.... [read more]

Election 2010: Media Gets it Wrong ... Again

Nathaniel Mehr considers the UK media's skewed coverage of the post-election political landscape. ... [read more]

One Holy Land United With Liberty and Justice for All

The absurd mythology of Zionism cannot hold firm forever, writes Ahmed Amr.... [read more]

From Gaza to Lebanon: Beware the Iron Wall, the Coming War

Israeli military strategists are planning for a new offensive against Lebanon, as Ramzy Baroud explains.... [read more]

Retrospective: Interview with Howard Zinn

The radical historian and activist Howard Zinn died this week, aged 87. In 2008, he gave this interview with London Progressive Journal's Daniel Pye.... [read more]

The Hypocrisy of Al-Demoqratia

A rising tide of official anti-Muslim paranoia in continental Europe is exposing the hypocrisy of Western democracy, writes Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

War, Negation and Muslim Identity Revisited

Ramzy Baroud on the reductionist caricatures which underpin the supposed 'clash of civilizations' between the West and Islam.... [read more]

Obama’s Test: Democracy or Chaos in Latin America

Will the Obama administration break with tradition and provide US support for democracy in Latin America? Probably not, if the Honduras coup is anything to go by, says Ramzy Baroud.... [read more]

Perpetual Grief over September 11th

In the wake of the 8th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of 11th September 2001, Ramzy Baroud examines the skewed framework within which the mainstream discourse has treated '9/11'.... [read more]

The Great Cop-Out

Impeded by Gordon Brown, the G20 has decided that bankers won’t be properly regulated, as George Monbiot explains.... [read more]

Drones and Democracy in Afghanistan

As Afghanistan goes to the polls amid a flurry of rhetoric about democratising the Middle East, Ramzy Baroud considers the democratic credentials of a US-led military campaign characterised by large-scale bombings and summary executions.... [read more]

Lover of the Country

Uri Avnery remembers a writer and activist who devoted his life to challenging the militarism of the Israeli state.... [read more]

Middle East 'Spies': A New Front for Gaza's Conflict

Ramzy Baroud examines a controversial new dimension to Israel's counter-terrorism strategy.... [read more]

Is the New Statesman Committing Suicide?

Examining a particularly unfortunate case of appalling journalism, Nathaniel Mehr wonders whether mainstream publications are complacent or just grossly out of touch.... [read more]

Book Review: John Docker, 'The Origins of Violence'

Tom Bangay reviews John Docker's expansive literary genealogy of genocidal violence.... [read more]

The Proceeds of Crime

The US and British governments have created a private prison industry which preys on human lives, says George Monbiot.... [read more]

Enter the Matrix...

Examining mainstream media coverage of recent international conflicts, Tomasz Pierscionek argues that the nearly all-encompassing false reality of the Hollywood sci-fi classic "The Matrix" is merely an example of art immitating life.... [read more]

Flying Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Guardian journalist George Monbiot poors scorn on the notion that climate change issues are the preserve of a misanthropic middle-class snobbery.... [read more]

Ecuador Pushing to Break Free from the Cycle of Debt

Samuele Mazzolini examines a bold new intiative from the Ecuadorean government, aimed at establishing a coordinated transnational policy among debtor nations with respect to the crippling debt burdens that are stifling progress in the developing world.... [read more]

Lest We Forget

George Monbiot asks: Could the First World War have been avoided?... [read more]

Difficult Times Ahead For Ecuador's Progressive New Constitution

Samuele Mazzolini on why Ecuador's new constitution is threatened by the vested economic and political interests of neoliberalism which have dominated Latin America for the past twenty years.... [read more]

The Contradiction of Choice from the Government

The Government offers us 'choice' as 'empowerment' but are they really giving us less choice as a result?... [read more]

Where does Labour stand after Miliband?

The recent intervention by David Miliband and the resulting manoeuvrings reveals much about the febrile state within the Labour Party. Beyond the Blairite-Brownite soap opera, which goes on even after one of the protagonists leaves the stage - rather like Ernie Wise continuing to define himself after poor Eric passed away - this is an existential crisis for Labour.... [read more]

The US Election and the Changing Face of Electoral Politics

Matt Genner on what the 2008 primaries have told us about the nature of electoral politics in the 21st Century.... [read more]

New EU Immigration Policy is a Disgrace to Europe

Samuele Mazzolini on the outrageous new direction taken by the EU on immigration.... [read more]

Palm Oil or Orang-utans? We Must Soon Decide Which we Prefer

Chris Bath on the campaign for greater regulation of the palm oil trade.... [read more]

Shadow Networks: Violence, War and Plunder in the Great Lakes Region of Africa

Colonial rivalry and capitalist exploitation are at the heart of the violence in the Congo.... [read more]

Interview: Howard Zinn talks to London Progressive Journal

Daniel Pye speaks to the legendary American historian and peace activist Howard Zinn.... [read more]

Conscription Is The Antidote To Militarism And Imperialism

We need to re-think the relationship between society and the military.... [read more]

Remembering My Lai

Ian Broughton reflects on the My Lai massacre, forty years on.... [read more]

This Week in the Media: Privatisation Isn't Working; Unsuccessful Gambler Recoups Money From Bookmakers

David Floyd argues that it's the job of private companies like Centrica to make as much profit as possible.... [read more]

Brown's Reactionary Britishness

The PM wants to celebrate Britishness...what does he mean?... [read more]

Popular Entertainment Update: Britney Spears in Trouble, Martin Amis is Not a Racist

David Floyd feels sorry for semi-clothed pop megastar Britney Spears, a product of turbocapitalism.... [read more]

In Like Flint...

Anthony Healy considers proposed changes to the council housing system.... [read more]